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Before They Were Famous: Check Out These Early Celebrity Food Commercials

Before They Were Famous: Check Out These Early Celebrity Food Commercials

Hey, we all have to start somewhere

Before They Were Famous: Check Out These Early Celebrity Food Commercials

Nobody ever said the path to fame was easy. For many A-list actors and actresses, the first credits on their résumés were commercials, and we tracked down 20 food commercials starring celebrities before they made it big.

Steve Carrell

No, this isn’t a parody video of Michael Scott’s job before Dunder-Mifflin; it’s actually Steve Carrell shilling for Chicago-based chain Brown’s Chicken.

Watch the video here.

Leonardo DiCaprio

Leo starred in several commercials before he hit it big, including blowing big bubbles for Bubble Yum.

Watch the video here.

Leonardo DiCaprio

And just for fun, here’s another DiCaprio greatest hit: desperately trying to enjoy a slice of delicious fat-free Kraft cheese, but it’s reserved solely “for daddy.” There’s something really unsettling about this commercial.

Watch the video here.

John Goodman and Megan Mullally

This commercial for the 99-cent Egg McMuffin is notable for three reasons: It stars both John Goodman and Megan Mullally, and features a forgotten jingle celebrating the famed breakfast sandwich.

Watch the video here.

Matt LeBlanc

We’re not quite sure why Matt LeBlanc rigs up a bottle of ketchup on a rooftop in this Heinz commercial, but if it helped him land his role on Friends, more power to him.

Watch the video here.

Demi Moore

In perhaps the most ‘80s commercial of all time, Demi Moore falls off a ledge in her quest for a can of Diet Coke, only to land safely and meet a handsome guy, of course.

Watch the video here.

Meg Ryan

Before Sally met Harry, Meg Ryan told us all about the “Aren’t You Hungry for a Whopper Game” at Burger King in this 1982 commercial.

Watch the video here.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.


Totally Radical! 10 Treats from the 1990s You Used to Love

Remember Bubble Tape? Wrigley introduced the hot-pink gum in the late 1980s, but it reached the height of its popularity in the '90s. Bubble Tape offered six feet of bubble gum wrapped in a spiral, encased in pink tape-dispenser-like shell. Bubble Tape was marketed exclusively to children, and successfully so. You can still find Bubble Tape in many stores today. Start tugging to see if it gives you the same joy as it did two decades ago.

If you want your mint chocolate chip ice cream scoops to have a green hue and your glass of Pepsi to include caramel coloring, you may have been one of the millions of people who opposed Pepsi going clear. The soda company's new drink, called "Crystal Pepsi," was Pepsi, only clear. For some reason it didn't stick. Crystal Pepsi appeared on the market in 1992. While it had a set of die-hard fans, by 1993 most people in the U.S. were tired of it. It lasted a little while longer in Europe, however.

Jawbreakers, also known as gobstoppers, are exactly what they sound like &mdash hard, tough balls made of sugar that are impossible to bite into. Although the little ones were cute, they, too, could wreak havoc on your teeth. The huge jawbreakers were impossible to work through in less than a few hours. Most children gnawed on their jawbreakers, waiting for them to get smaller and smaller. This candy was best for the patient child (some children are patient, right?). The rest of us just had to pretend to be patient or give up and move onto something easier, like Gummy Bears.

Laffy Taffy was introduced by the Willy Wonka Candy Company in the 1970s, but the candy didn't really become very popular until the '90s. The individually wrapped, chewy, tongue-staining, colorful taffys had jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy candies are still on the market, but they don't make 'em like they used to &mdash they are now flatter and longer, with a bit more design flair. Why were they so popular? The name? The tartness? Perhaps a combination of both? We'll need a time machine to go back and take an informal poll. And while we're there, we will need to taste all of them, too. You know, for research.

In the 1990s, the myth surrounding Poprocks was that if you mixed them with soda the combination would explode in your stomach. Thankfully it was just a myth! The little Poprocks did differ from typical candy in that they created a fizzy reaction in your mouth. Truth be told, as far as "fun" food goes, Poprocks was pretty high on the list. How could kids resist? Though popular in the 1990s, they are also associated with the 1970s, making them a multi-generational candy &mdash one you and your parents may have enjoyed together!

"Don't push ME, push a push pop!" was the slogan used to promote Push Pops. You could continue to enjoy the long-lasting lollipop in a tube by pushing it up as the top disappeared. There was even a cap you could put on top of the pop so that you could save it for later &mdash genius! On the heels of the Push Pops were Ring Pops, but those were a little harder to cover up.

The '90s, as you already know, was an era of many wonders &mdash not the least of which was edible jewelry! Ring Pops were lollipops you could wear on your fingers. The candy part was shaped like an oversized, glowing jewel, and the actual ring was plastic. With these little candies &mdash much like Push Pops &mdash kids could keep their fingers from getting sticky while eating. The best part, however, might have been the ease with which you could present one of these to the object of your grade-school affection. Even if rejected, it was all yours to enjoy!

The "Ice Cream of the Future" was invented in 1987 by flash-freezing ice cream mix in liquid notrogen. The result was ice cream shaped into tiny little balls. Dippin' Dots was big in the '90s despite the fact that it was never sold at grocery stores because of demanding cooling requirements. Instead, as you may remember, Dippin' Dots was sold at individual outlets, in stadiums, malls, and theme parks. The Dots are still around, but now the "Ice Cream of the Future" is more like a relic of the past. Did you go nuts for these? Or did you prefer regular ice cream?

What is the lesson we can learn from Lunchables? Perhaps that anything is better than a brown-bag lunch. In the '90s, Lunchables were a hit. The pre-packed lunches typically held crackers, cheese, and meat, which kids put together themselves when it was time to eat. Lunchables were wildly popular among kids as well as parents, who were now off the hook from packing lunch. At the height of their popularity, Lunchables also offered burgers, hot dogs, and make-your-own "pizza." Since then, it's been DIY everything, rendering Lunchables a bit less innovative than they were when they first arrived on the scene.

It's hard to pinpoint exactly what set Capri Sun apart from the rest of the drinks on the market at the time. Was it the packaging? The pouch? The fantastic advertising? It's still sold today, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be &mdash maybe because even adults had trouble getting those little straws into the right place on the pouch. There's even a Facebook page called "The Devastation of Losing your Straw on your Capri Sun," which has received 9,000 likes. That said, there was no denying the joy of putting a Capri Sun in the freezer and enjoying it as a slushy treat later. Since it hit the market in the '90s, the brand has reduced the amount of sugar per pouch and introduced "new options everyone can feel good about," like their 100% juices and green production practices.