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Here’s How to Add a Little Booze to Your Holiday Baking

Here’s How to Add a Little Booze to Your Holiday Baking

Warm up with some boozy desserts this holiday season

These chocolate cupcakes are enhanced with the addition of bourbon to the batter.

Let’s be honest, some of our favorite winter-time cocktails already taste like dessert, so why not brighten your spirits by turning that hot buttered rum or white Russian into a delicious baked good?

From bourbon to vodka, you can make the most out of your bar cart by parking it right next your mixing bowl. You can use recipes that already incorporate alcohol so you get the measurements just right, like this recipe for Maple Bourbon Pecan Pie or this one for a saucy pumpkin cupcake. You can even freely add in a splash here and there to otherwise non-alcoholic recipes.

However, if you are looking to add a hint of something stronger than sugar to this season’s baked goods, there are a few things you should know about baking with booze, so we asked Leslie Feinberg, co-owner of Prohibition Bakery in New York City, which is famous for their alcohol-augmented cupcakes to give us some tips for how to successfully add booze to your baked goods:

  1. Booze can make a great flavoring, but if you want your baked goods to be high-proof, make sure to add it after baking so it doesn't bake off. Try incorporating alcohol into frostings, ganache, caramel sauces, fruit sauces, and glazes.
  2. Just because you wouldn't normally drink something, doesn't mean it won't make a delicious addition to your baked goods. For instance, even if you prefer your drinks on the sweet side, you might find that you love a bitters-based frosting. Although you know what you like, don't be afraid to experiment.
  3. And conversely, your favorite drink does not always translate well into a sweet treat. We have a long running joke about a dry gin martini cupcake, but really some flavors are too subtle and too savory to really be expressed once they're combined with the sugar, flour, etc. necessary to make a delicious baked good.
  4. Much like mixing drinks, and possibly even more so, balance is really important. Some spirits are more flavor-forward than others. Tequila, whiskey, and rum have such strong, distinctive flavors, whereas vodka, gin, and sometimes even beer and wine, can get lost in the mix if you're not careful. If you're baking with less flavor-forward spirits, you'll want to pay close attention to the other flavors you're playing off of. Choose your spirits carefully and really focus on proportions.

For more tips and recipes, check out the newly released cookbook, Prohibition Bakery.


Angela Carlos is the Cook Editor at The Daily Meal. Find her on Twitter and tweet @angelaccarlos.


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!


Homemade Liqueurs

With no special equipment required, homemade liqueurs are very easy to make!

Most homemade liqueurs start with vodka. This spirit is an ideal base for liqueurs because it&aposs colorless and flavorless, making it the perfect blank canvas.

Try creating some of the most popular liqueur flavors, like coffee, amaretto, and Irish cream -- they all rely on vodka for their kick. Or you may prefer to infuse the subtle essences of herbs, spices or fruit. Don&apost be afraid to experiment with rum, tequila, gin, brandy, and whiskey infusions as well.

Explore our complete collection of Homemade Liqueur Recipes.

Pick a Flavor

There are two ways to add flavor to liquor:

1. Mix flavored extracts right into liquor.
2. Choose the flavoring ingredients in their raw form and allow them to steep in the alcohol for days or weeks.

Using extracts is the fastest way to make a batch of liqueur, and there are a few cases (e.g. with almond extract), where this is the best way to achieve the flavor you&aposre after. More often than not, though, you will get the best results when you slowly infuse the liquor with fresh ingredients. For example, lemon cordial made with fresh lemon zest will taste much better than something made with lemon extract. Using fresh ingredients also allows you to introduce more variety you won&apost be able to find as wide a variety of extracts and essences as you will of fruits and herbs and spices.

Infusing liquor is not an exact science, but more a matter of taste. Infuse each flavor to suit your own preferences and if it ends up tasting too strong, you can always dilute it with additional liquor.

Here are some flavoring ideas:

Fruit: Orange zest, lemon zest, kumquats, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, peaches, tart apples, pineapple, pomegranate seeds, dried apricots, or dried sour cherries. Whole fruit should be sliced and/or mashed to allow the juices to escape and let the liquor come in contact with as much surface area as possible. Leave the skin on for maximum flavor.

Herbs and spices: Vanilla beans, coriander seeds, peppercorns, hot chiles, lemongrass, cinnamon sticks, cloves, nutmeg, whole coffee beans, dill, thyme, basil, tarragon, rosemary, or even garlic. Be sparing with the cloves and nutmeg: too much of these ingredients can produce a numbing effect in your mouth!

Try combining a couple of different flavors in the same batch: how about apple-cinnamon, chile-lemongrass, lemon-tarragon, orange-cranberry, or raspberry-vanilla? Just don&apost try to pack too many different things into one bottle, or you won&apost be able to distinguish the flavors.

Give it a Rest

Once you&aposve chosen your alcohol and your flavorings, simply combine them.

  • Put flavorings right into the liquor, or any glass or earthenware jar/bottle with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Keep the container in a dark place and leave it at room temperature. If you don&apost have a dark cupboard in your house, put the bottles in a paper grocery bag and stir or rotate them a couple of times a day.
  • Depending on how potent your flavorings are, you&aposll need to let them steep for anywhere from a day to a few weeks. Most fruit needs a full two to four weeks for all the flavor to be transferred to the alcohol, whereas chiles, garlic, and most fresh spices only need a couple of days.

Smell and taste the infusions to decide when each is ready.

If you&aposve used mashed fruit, your infusion is now going to have bits of sediment in the bottom. To get rid of it, simply line a strainer with a coffee filter and slowly pour the liquor through. Don&apost try to save the fruit that&aposs been soaking in the booze--it won&apost have any flavor left in it.

Add a Little Sweetness

When sweetening your liqueurs, don&apost add sugar directly to the alcohol -- it will take too long to dissolve and you won&apost be able to tell right away how sweet it is. Instead, make a simple syrup of two parts sugar to one part water. Combine them in a saucepan and simmer them on the stove until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and then sweeten the infusion to taste. Once a liqueur has been sweetened, most of them taste better after they&aposve had a chance to "age" for a month or so. Aging allows the flavors to mellow and blend.

Bottle It Up

Scour local import stores, thrift stores or your own cupboards to find interesting glass bottles (if they don&apost have tops, you can buy corks at craft stores or winemaking supply shops). Have fun creating your own custom labels and "garnish" each finished bottle by dropping in a small quantity of the original ingredients (a few berries, a twist of citrus zest, an herb sprig, etcetera).

Serving Your Homemade Liqueurs

Most homemade infusions are wonderful when served unadorned, straight out of the freezer. They are also beautiful when mixed into a fresh cup coffee or drizzled over a scoop of good vanilla ice cream,

Any homemade liqueur can be substituted in a traditional cocktail with wonderful results. Make amazing martinis with your infused vodkas, or have fun inventing your own brand new signature drinks!