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Bolognese ragu with tagliatelle

Bolognese ragu with tagliatelle

finely chop the onion, carrot and celery.

In a bowl, melt the butter with the oil and add the vegetables, cook until soft, but not frying, then add the pancetta and minced meat. mix well to homogenize, cook over low heat very well, adding a little meat broth. after about 15 minutes, add the wine and let it evaporate completely.

then add the tomato paste, salt and let it simmer to continue cooking for about a good hour, adding a little soup, as needed.

at the end, add the milk (the original recipe is with milk, but it can also be missing - I put it and it's good that way) and let it simmer until everything is absorbed. matches pepper and possibly salt.

ragu alla bolognese is served here with tagliatelle, but it goes just as well with spaghetti. Parmesan cheese can be added on top.

good appetite!


Tagliatelle with bolognese ragù

Tagliatelle with ragù alla bolognese is a typical dish of the Emilian tradition, but now a true symbol of our country around the world. Let's see how to prepare them to the best and some useful tips to get a really perfect first course


Green tagliatelle with bolognese ragù

Tagliatelle, an extraordinary piece of pasta history.

Porous, handmade and seasoned with generosity ladle of sauces or ragù prepared by mothers and grandmothers.

This is not just a plate of pasta, it is a memory, it is poetry.

Take some time for the fresh pasta with the ragù. Invite family or friends because there is never a shortage of ragù and pasta.

Ingredients:

For the pasta
500 g of flour 00
5 eggs
its
50 g of steamed spinach and reduced to cream

For the Bolognese ragù
1 kg of minced meat (30% veal, 30% beef, 40% sausage)
carrot
onion
celery ribs
60 g of butter
tomato concentrate
1 glass of wine
bay leaves
latte q.b.

Brown the meat in a pan with a drizzle of oil.

In a second pan, melt the butter and add finely chopped celery, carrot and onion.

When the vegetables have softened, add the meat, stir and wait for everything to sizzle.

Then pour in the wine and wait for it to evaporate over low heat.

Add the concentrate and mix.

Add the milk little by little, it will take about 400 ml.

Salt and add the bay leaves, stir and cook over very low heat as long as you can until you have a creamy and thick sauce.

Arrange the flour in a fountain, open the eggs in the middle, add salt and boiled and squeezed spinach and start collecting a little flour at a time from the outside to the inside of the fountain.

In this way you will bind eggs and flour.

When the eggs are bound, start kneading vigorously until you get a smooth, compact dough.

Let the dough rest covered for at least 30 minutes before using. Now you decide the thickness.

Roll it out, roll it up and make the noodles.

Let the pasta rest for a few minutes before dipping it in boiling salted water for a couple of minutes.

Drain the pasta and put it in the pan with the ragù, mix and serve very hot with a few tablespoons of ragù on top.


Bolognese ragu with tagliatelle - Recipes


The famous ragù that accompanies tagliatelle is often bastardized by what I call international hotel cooking. I have eaten horrible to adequate Bolognese sauces in as disparate places as a train station in Lübeck, Germany, and a hotel in Luxor, Egypt. Nowhere but Bologna, its home, can you find its flavor so inviting and its taste so rich. This recipe is one of the richest enhancements of the classic ragù from Bologna, which was once much simpler. The meats need to be lean, otherwise there will be too much fat in the sauce. The meat can be ground in a food processor using very short bursts or pulses, resulting in a very finely chopped effect. Remember that "very finely chopped" means pieces no bigger than this "o," so you may consider using the food processor for all the ingredients, again, using short bursts. For readers who want to learn more about this dish see Lynn Rosetta Kaspar's The Splendid Table.

Yield: Makes 6 servings
Preparation Time: 2:45 hours

1. In a large, heavy skillet, melt the butter with the olive oil over medium-heat and cook the pancetta, prosciutto, and mortadella until the pancetta is soft and a bit rendered, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the mushrooms, onion, garlic, carrot, celery, and parsley and cook until the vegetables have softened and turned color, about 10 minutes, stirring as needed. Add the beef, pork, veal, and chicken livers and brown, about 10 minutes.

2. Increase the heat to medium-high and add the wine. Once the wine has evaporated, reduce the heat to low add the tomato sauce diluted with a little water and the beef broth. Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Cover and simmer for 2 hours. Add the cream and cook another 10 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil, salt abundantly, and add the pasta. Drain when al dente and transfer to a serving platter. Ladle the ragù on top and serve immediately. The ragù can be frozen for up to 4 months.

Note: Note 1: To make a quick tomato sauce, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet, then cook 2 pounds of crushed fresh or canned peeled and seeded tomatoes and some finely chopped garlic until dense over medium heat.

Note 2: A simpler method is to cook the onion with the celery and carrot in the oil and butter, adding the ground beef, but not the other meats, the wine, salt and pepper, nutmeg and 1 1/2 cups of tomato sauce . Follow the recipe above, eliminating all the ingredients except those called for in this note.


Tagliatelle Recipe with Rag & ugrave alla Bolognese [Original]

it rag & ugrave It is one of the most well-known specialties on the scene bolognese, but it is not very different from the classic recipe of the Italian rag & ugrave.

In many they use different types of meat, in the recipe below, partly taken from this fantastic book, & egrave present in greater quantity & agrave beef and only a little pork. It is one of my favorite combinations because beef serves to give consistency to the sauce while the pork with its high fat content makes the sauce thicker and fuller.

Of course, the beef should not be too lean, if that's how it should be, make it half-sour and half-sour or add a little pork belly (not the smoked one).

The secret of every rag & ugrave & egrave the timing. It is very important to follow each step without haste and with patience precisely because the long cooking is the fundamental part of the preparation.

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The cooking will be the one that decreers the fate of your rag & ugrave, so follow what I tell you below.

A perfect pairing for this sauce are the fresh Tagliatelle all & rsquouovo but many also do it with polenta.

Now let's move on to the ingredients, but first I only ask you one thing.

It took me a long time (and many pounds of tomato paste) to find the right balance and to write my perfect recipe of rag & ugrave alla Bolognese and I only ask you a small favor, share this article with your contacts.

What do I give you in return? I reveal to you exact ingredients to prepare this fantastic dish.

Click on the buttons below, share the post and the ingredients will automatically appear & # 128578 thanks!


Tagliatelle Bolognese: History

Lucrezia Borgia, the notorious illegitimate daughter of Pope Alexander VI, is often cited as the inspiration fortagliatelle. In her day she was described as having, “a radiant smile, two blond braids, a pearl-rimmed handkerchief, one poison potion. ”According to legend, a chef wanted to honor her lovely golden hair by creating a special pasta for her upcoming wedding to Duke d’Este in Ferrara in the early 1500s. Although a charming notion, the legend is actually quite recent, originating in the 1930s by the Italian humorist, Augusto Majani.

The actual origin of tagliatelle is difficult to pinpoint as its history is interwoven with that of other centuries-old long pasta shapes. One of the earliest written references is in Bartolomeo Scappi’s 1570 cookbook AThe Art of Cooking. A non-cookery reference from 1630 points to the popularity of tagliatelle, according to Dr. Giancarlo Gonizzi, Director of the renowned culinary library at Academia Barilla in Parma. Dr. Gonizzi notes, “Girolamo Aleandri in The Defense of Adone (Venice 1630), describing a scene from court life, wrote: Playing some gentlemen at the Marquis Pepoli's house, it was said by one of them in jest, that he was drunk on tagliatelle. ”

“Short accounts and long noodles”, (May you have “short bills and long tagliatelle”) was a popular saying in Bologna, cited in Italy’s famed 19 th century cookbook by Pellegrino Artusi,The Science of Cooking and the Art of Eating Well (“​Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well ’). Artusi explains, “because big bills frighten poor husbands, and short tagliatelle. indicating an inexperienced pasta maker. seem like [mere] kitchen leftovers. ” (Leftover bits of pasta dough were often cut into tiny pieces to serve in soup.) Laila Tentoni, President of Casa Artusi, a culinary center dedicated to the author and located in the town of Forlimpopoli in Emilia-Romagna, expounds on the regional importance of tagliatelle: “In Romagna, years ago, they told small children, 'if you don't eat tagliatelle you won't grow big', and to young girls they'd warn, 'if you don't learn to make pasta dough with a rolling pin and how to make tagliatelle you won't get married. 'In short, for a Romagnolo, tagliatelle is both a burden and a delight an essential part of the collective imagination. ”

In 1972, The Order of the Tortellino and The Academy of Italian Cuisine underscored the importance of tagliatelle with Bolognese ragoutby registering the official recipe in Bologna’s Chamber of Commerce and including tagliatelle’s ideal dimensions. The document specifies that the proper width of cooked tagliatelle should be 8 mm (0.314 inch), also expressed as a specific fraction (1 / 12,270) of the height of the Bologna’s famed Torre degli Asinelli! Tagliatelle are so important to the Bolognese that a gold representation of the perfect dimensions is housed in the Bologna Chamber of Commerce.

This pasta shape is so beloved that it has its own special day of celebration: January 17 is International Tagliatelle Day.


Bolognese ragu with tagliatelle - Recipes


The famous ragù that accompanies tagliatelle is often bastardized by what I call international hotel cooking. I have eaten horrible to adequate Bolognese sauces in as disparate places as a train station in Lübeck, Germany, and a hotel in Luxor, Egypt. Nowhere but Bologna, its home, can you find its flavor so inviting and its taste so rich. This recipe is one of the richest enhancements of the classic ragù from Bologna, which was once much simpler. The meats need to be lean, otherwise there will be too much fat in the sauce. The meat can be ground in a food processor using very short bursts or pulses, resulting in a very finely chopped effect. Remember that "very finely chopped" means pieces no bigger than this "o," so you may consider using the food processor for all the ingredients, again, using short bursts. For readers who want to learn more about this dish see Lynn Rosetta Kaspar's The Splendid Table.

Yield: Makes 6 servings
Preparation Time: 2:45 hours

1. In a large, heavy skillet, melt the butter with the olive oil over medium-heat and cook the pancetta, prosciutto, and mortadella until the pancetta is soft and a bit rendered, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the mushrooms, onion, garlic, carrot, celery, and parsley and cook until the vegetables have softened and turned color, about 10 minutes, stirring as needed. Add the beef, pork, veal, and chicken livers and brown, about 10 minutes.

2. Increase the heat to medium-high and add the wine. Once the wine has evaporated, reduce the heat to low add the tomato sauce diluted with a little water and the beef broth. Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Cover and simmer for 2 hours. Add the cream and cook another 10 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil, salt abundantly, and add the pasta. Drain when al dente and transfer to a serving platter. Ladle the ragù on top and serve immediately. The ragù can be frozen for up to 4 months.

Note: Note 1: To make a quick tomato sauce, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet, then cook 2 pounds of crushed fresh or canned peeled and seeded tomatoes and some finely chopped garlic until dense over medium heat.

Note 2: A simpler method is to cook the onion with the celery and carrot in the oil and butter, adding the ground beef, but not the other meats, the wine, salt and pepper, nutmeg and 1 1/2 cups of tomato sauce . Follow the recipe above, eliminating all the ingredients except those called for in this note.


The tricks to make the perfect rag & ugrave noodles like in Bologna

One of the most popular dishes on pseudo-Italian menus abroad is spaghetti alla bolognese. Often crippled in gorgeous variations like spaghetti bolonaise, even when the name is written well, we bet that the dish will not be as well. Also because, simply, it does not exist: there was a fake dish, like and worse than Alfredo's fettuccine, a mixture of two names with an Italian sound and nothing worse. What instead is a real traditional Emilian dish are the tagliatelle alla bolognese, egg pasta and rag & ugrave of meat in an explosive encounter.

They are recipes with simple ingredients as for all popular cuisine, yet they require a certain manuality, a certain exercise: nothing better for these days of prudence and self-exclusion, than trying and trying to make the perfect pastry, and the long preparation of rag & ugrave. Let's start with the latter.

The recipe for the rag & ugrave alla bolognese, that is, with minced meat, includes a mixture of beef and pork, with not too lean parts. The ideal would be to beat it with a knife, but if we have it ground in a butcher's shop, we ask for a large grind. Make the stir-fry with onions, carrots and celery, add the minced meat, always over a very low heat, brown. Blend with red wine and then add the tomato, in slightly diluted concentrate or puree. Cooking should be slow, 2 or 3 hours, and in an open pan, stirring occasionally and adding hot water or broth if you are drying too much. The final consistency should be creamy and dense.

For the egg pasta recipe, use 100 grams of soft wheat flour for each egg: first mix with a fork, then knead by hand, long and firmly. A rest time of the dough of at least half an hour will be necessary: ​​cover well with cling film. The pastry will then be carefully pulled, whether you proceed by hand with the rolling pin or you have the machine: in the first case flattening the dough a little at a time and applying light pressure by moving the rolling pin from the center to the edges in the second case folding and folding several times the piece of dough that you let go in the machine, and only then reducing the thickness.

If you use the machine, you just need to move the crank in the noodle cylinder, but only once it has reached the right thickness. If you proceed with the flattener, form a pastry as wide as you want and as long as the desired length of the noodles bring the edges towards the center and fold further, flouring lightly to prevent it from sticking: at this point cut with a knife and reopen the noodles. Cook in plenty of salted water for a few minutes (fresh pasta is not as good as dry pasta, it needs less rehydration, especially egg pasta). Join the rag & ugrave, enjoy it.


Tagliatelle with quick bolognese ragu (tagliatelle with meat sauce)

  • 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1 carrot, washed, peeled, ends cut, and finely chopped
  • 1 rib of celery, washed, ends cut, and finely chopped
  • 50 grams of butter
  • 150 grams pork sausage (look for ones with flavoring such as fennel seed, herbs, etc)
  • 300 grams of minced beef, finely diced (can replace some of the beef with minced vealand / or pork)
  • 50 mls red wine
  • 200 mls tomato puree (past)
  • 120 mls milk
  • 350 grams dried egg noodles pasta
  • 40 grams Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  1. Bring to a boil 5 liters of water and 50 grams of salt.
  2. In a sauté pan over medium heat, sauté the onion, carrot and celery in the butter until the vegetables are soft, about 3 to 5 minutes.
  3. Turn the heat up to high and add the beef and the sausage. Stir with a wooden spoon until the meat has colored.
  4. Add the red wine and let it evaporate by & # 8532rds, about 10 minutes. Then add the tomato, salt, and pepper.
  5. When the meat has cooked, about 20 minutes, add the milk and cook for as long as possible.
  6. While the sauce is cooking, cook the pasta for the time indicated on the package. Drain the pasta well (do not rinse or add olive oil to the pasta). Divide the pasta into 4 bowls and top with the sauce. Serve with Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.

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