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Cola-Braised Pork Stew

Cola-Braised Pork Stew

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 pounds boneless country-style pork ribs, excess fat trimmed, cut into 1 1/2- to 2-inch cubes
  • 2 cups cola (do not use diet cola)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped peeled fresh ginger
  • 1 bunch green onions, chopped

Recipe Preparation

  • Heat oil in large pot over high heat. Add half of pork; sauté until brown on all sides, about 8 minutes. Transfer pork to bowl. Repeat with remaining pork. Return pork to pot. Turn off heat and pour cola slowly into pot. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer 30 minutes. Add garlic, soy sauce, ginger, and half of green onions. Cover and simmer until pork is tender, about 50 minutes longer. Uncover and simmer until sauce is slightly thickened, about 10 minutes. Season stew with salt and pepper. Transfer to bowl; sprinkle with remaining green onions.

Recipe by Juli Tsuchiya WaldronReviews Section

Karl’s Japanese Coca-Cola Braised Pork

I love Japanese pickled vegetables and I frequently get the urge to make them. The day before my Sunday dinner I started to make a bunch. Sometimes the side dishes lead you to the main dish, rather than the other way around.

Karl’s Japanese Coca-Cola Braised Pork

The question became, “What do I serve with all of these pickles?” One of the food trucks that come around our neighborhood—the Chairman—serves a Coca-Cola® braised pork with pickled vegetables. We really like it and I decided that I would try my hand at making something like it with a Japanese twist.

Looking at on-line recipes for Japanese braised pork and Coca Cola pork recipes, I explored the range of ingredients and techniques. I wanted the flavor to be both delicately Japanese and distinctively cola. Strong flavors and heavy seasonings—like the garlic and oregano of other recipes—were right out. I finally decided on only a few ingredients.

Negi—Welsh onions—look and smell very similar to spring onions, but they are about 2 feet long. Their flavor is more delicate than European leeks. If you do not have a handy Japanese store nearby they may be hard to find. You may replace this ingredient with leeks or green onions, but the flavors will be stronger.

Besides the Coco-Cola, I added a bit of soy sauce and saki to my braising liquid. To round out the Japanese flavors I added ginger and a few Japanese chilies. I wanted it to be simple, not tasteless.

I planned to serve brown rice with this pork, but some of my diners are avoiding starch. I decided to add some daikon for them. If you wish, you could easily replace the daikon with potatoes and still be in the spirit of the dish.

After Dinner Note: Five diners easily polished off two pounds of this at one sitting. Eilene’s comment was that it was “meat butter,” because it melted in your mouth.

Karl’s Japanese Coca-Cola Braised Pork

Ingredients

3-4 lb. bone in pork shoulder
1 tsp. kosher salt

2 Tbs. neutral oil, like canola
2 cups negi, coarsely chopped
12 oz. Coco-Cola Coke Classic
¼ cup soy sauce
1 inch fresh ginger, peeled and sliced into coins
2 Japanese dried red chilies, torn into pieces
1± cup saki

1 lb. daikon radish, peeled and cut into 1 inch chunks (optional)
1 tsp. corn starch mixed with water (optional)

Directions

1. Sprinkle salt all over the pork shoulder and wrap it will in plastic wrap. Let it sit for at least one hour.

Tip: Do not cut apart or punch holes in the meat, you do not want all of the juices leaking out of the roast.

2. Trim, split the negi in half lengthwise, and chop it into one inch pieces. Set them aside.

3. On the stove top, heat the oil in a large Dutch oven, until shimmering, and brown the pork well on all sides, about 8 minutes per side.

Tip: Be careful not to burn the crust—despite Jan’s beliefs—charcoal is not a flavoring to be encouraged.

4. Remove the meat from the Dutch oven and deglaze the bottom with a splash of water.

5. When the water has almost evaporated, add the nigi and sauté until well wilted and starting to pick up some color.

6. Preheat the oven to 350º F.

7. Add the Coke Classic, soy sauce, and ginger to the pot.

Tip: Scrape the bottom to make sure nothing is sticking that might burn later.

8. Tear the chilies in half and add them to the pot.

Tip: Depending on how hot you like your food, you may discard some or all of the chili seeds. The seeds are where most of the “heat” of the chilies reside.

9. Return the pork to the pot and add enough saki to bring the liquid level half way up the sides of the roast.

10. Bring the pot to a boil, and spoon the liquid over the roast.

11. Cover the pot and transfer it to a 350º F oven.

12. Leave the Dutch oven undisturbed for one hour.

13. Turn the roast over, stir the liquid, and spoon it over the roast. Recover and continue cooking for a second hour.

14. Transfer the pork to a plate and put the braising liquid into a standing blender.

Tip: Rinse out the pot with a splash of saki to remove most of the sauce from the bottoms of the pot. This prevents any residue from burning and “smoking” the meat with a burned flavor.

Note: If you do not want the dish to be too spicy, fish out the chilies and ginger coins at this point and discard them.

15. Return the pork to the Dutch oven, cover, and return it to the oven. Continue baking the pork for a third hour.

16. Blend the sauce until very smooth and strain out any large bits.

17. Transfer the sauce to a pot and simmer on medium high to reduce the volume by half.

18. Add the daikon to the sauce and simmer until fully cooked, about 20 minutes.

19. If the sauce is not thick enough you may add some corn starch until it reaches your desired thickness.

20 Transfer the pork to a serving platter and arrange the daikon around it. Spoon the sauce over the meat and serve.

Tip: Serve any extra sauce on the side for your diners to add as they wish.


Slow Cooker Coca-Cola Pork Roast

This pork roast uses that same combination of good ole Co'Cola and dry onion soup mix we love on a beef roast, and the same as that beef roast that is so delicious, so is a pork loin done the same way. Yes, we Southerners like to cook with Coke - which of course includes things like 7-up and Dr Pepper and root beer, of course - because we all know that Coke covers all beverage bases in the South.

We also love using onion soup mix and Ranch dressing mix, just like we love using cream soups occasionally to stand in for a cream sauce and Velveeta along with cheddar and other cheeses, because of that ultra creaminess it adds to mac and cheese. Hey, don't you worry, we do plenty of scratch cooking in the South too and we don't eat all that stuff on a daily basis, so we'd really appreciate if the food police would just move along and leave our pantries alone.

So, anyway. there have been some crazy exciting things happening on the home-front here since 2014 showed up. Many of you know I had a big surgery, and yes, the report was good and I'm doing well, except for the fact that you really are supposed to limit yourself and avoid a lot of exertion and heavy lifting and such for a full 3 months, and many of you who happen to be wives and mothers are saying "yeah, right," right along with me, aren't you? I've been obedient to my doctor. well, for the most part, except for the fact that - The Cajun and I are in the process of moving!

We're having some pre-move-in minor construction at the new house, while moving in what we can, so we're sort of living between two households right now. There are so many features of this new-to-me house that I adore, it's away from the Gulf and around the corner from the grandkids, it has a real front porch, a beautiful high covered patio, a huge double lot backyard, a separate laundry and mudroom, and a gigantic walk-in pantry. but the one thing that I am the most excited about is my new kitchen which is about three times the size of my current galley one. Of course, all this means a new mortgage again, and at my age, I am both super excited and terrified, all at the same time!

What does one thing have to do with the other? Well. I'm squeezing in this variation of this recipe for those reasons and also because when I point folks to the beef roast when talking about the pork roast, well, it's just a little confusing. Now I can just point to this one dedicated to pork.

Recipe: Slow Cooker Coca-Cola Pork Roast

  • 1 (2 to 5 pound ) pork loin roast
  • 1 envelope of onion soup mix
  • 1/4 teaspoon of dried thyme , crushed
  • 2 cans of Coca Cola Classic
  • 1/4 cup of all purpose flour and water to make a slurry for thickening

Add roast to slow cooker, sprinkle with onion soup mix and thyme pour coke all around. Cover and cook on LOW for about 2 to 4 hours, depending on the size. Remove, and let stand before slicing.

While roast is resting, carefully transfer the hot pan drippings to a skillet. Make a slurry by combing 1/4 cup of flour with just enough water to dissolve it. Mix the slurry completely so that there are no lumps. Whisk into the pan drippings and bring to a boil, whisking constantly, until mixture thickens. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes, whisking regularly.

Slice the meat and place on a platter drizzle gravy on top of the meat and put the remaining gravy in a gravy boat for the table.

Cook's Notes: Do not overcook. A 2 to 5 pound pork loin only needs from 2 to 4 hours on low, depending on the size. Use an instant read thermometer to check the temperature at the earliest time, which should read between 140 to 145 degrees when done. For a homemade substitute for onion soup mix, use 1-1/2 tablespoons of dried onion flakes, 1/2 tablespoon of beef base (like Better than Bouillon) or 1 tablespoon of granular beef bouillon, 1 teaspoon of onion powder and 1/8 teaspoon of some type of seasoned salt (like Lawry's).

Electronic Pressure Cooker: For a 2 to 3 pound roast, prepare as above, securing lid and setting to HIGH pressure. Cook for 40 minutes, let pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then quick release. Check roast for tenderness and re-secure the lid, cooking on HIGH for an additional 10 minutes, with a 10 minute natural release. Remove roast and prepare gravy as above, using pressure cooker with the lid off, and if there is a browning setting.

Check These Recipes Out Too Y'all!

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Good Ol' Southern Pork Stew

Just made this one for dinner tonight. I made it a few weeks ago and my husband requested a repeat. The funny part is that he hates to eat pork, and he doesn't even realize he is eating sweet potatoes. He is a very picky eater so when he requests something that tastes this good I can't wait to make it for him. This is another of my accidental recipes that worked out beautiful. I was planning on preparing beef stew for a luncheon I was attending the next day. To my surprise the steaks I had bought to make it with were missing. So in a last minute panic I decided to use pork as a substitute and prayed for the best. Wow, I got lucky it was one of those mistakes that just so happens to melt in your mouth. I just kept getting requests for my recipe of Good Ol' Souther Pork Stew. I hope you enjoy this as we have. The funny part is I make my beef stew the same way just with beef instead of pork. I like to use the crock pot for this recipe. Its great to just throw in the pot in the morning and then come home to it after a long day.


Coca-Cola-Braised Pork Belly

Malaysian-born blogger Grace Choo loves to eat, but she doesn&rsquot always want to spend a whole day prepping in the kitchen. Instead she focuses on easily executed dishes, many of which she features on her blog, Piggy&rsquos Cooking Journal. This recipe for pork belly braised in Coca-Cola is deliciously salty-sweet and can even be made a day ahead of time.

1 daikon, peeled and cut into ½-inch thick slices
2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
8 ¼-inch slices peeled fresh ginger
2 green onions, roots trimmed and cut into long strips, plus more for garnish
5 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
1 lb. pork belly, skin removed, cut into 3/4-inch-thick slices
¼ cup light soy sauce
½ cup dark soy sauce
Pepper, to taste
3 Tbsp. rice wine
1 ½ cups Coca-Cola
4 ¼ cups water
1 carrot, peeled and cut into ½-inch thick slices

Bring a medium saucepan of water to a boil. Add the daikon, reduce heat to medium and simmer for 20 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Heat a wok over medium-high heat and add the vegetable oil. When the oil is heated, add ginger, spring onion and garlic cloves. Sauté until aromatic. Add the sliced pork belly and continue sautéing for four minutes. Add the light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, pepper and rice wine. Transfer the ingredients to a clay pot (a medium soup pot may also be used) and add the Coca-Cola and water. Cover and bring just to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Add carrot slices and reserved daikon and simmer for additional 30 minutes. Remove pot from heat and let sit, covered, for 15 minutes. Ladle into bowls and garnish with chopped spring onions.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sweet paprika
  • 2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 4-lb. beef brisket, trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 4 onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups cola
  • 1 28-oz. can crushed tomatoes

Combine brown sugar, salt, paprika, onion powder and pepper in a small bowl. Rub mixture all over brisket.

Warm oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Cook brisket until browned on all sides, turning with tongs, about 7 minutes total. Transfer meat to slow cooker.

Arrange onions on top of brisket. Whisk together cola and tomatoes in a large bowl and pour over onions and brisket. Cover and cook on low until meat is fork-tender, 7 to 8 hours.

Transfer meat to a cutting board and allow to stand for 10 minutes. Remove gravy from slow cooker. Slice meat against the grain and serve with gravy.


Coca-Cola Braised Beef Brisket

1 (3 1/2-pound) beef brisket flat, trimmed of excess fat
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 large sweet onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 (20-ounce) bottle Coca-Cola
2 cups beef broth
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
Chopped fresh chives, for serving

Heat the oven to 250 degrees

Season brisket on all sides with salt and pepper and place in a large Dutch oven. Add the onion, Coca-Cola, broth, vinegar, Worcestershire and Dijon, and stir to combine. Cover with the lid and place in the oven.

Cook until a knife can be inserted with no resistance, about 8 hours. Remove pot from the oven and let brisket sit in the cooking liquid until ready to serve. When brisket is cool enough to handle, slice thinly and serve with braising liquid, sprinkled with chives.


Coca-Cola-Braised Pork Belly

Malaysian-born blogger Grace Choo loves to eat, but she doesn&rsquot always want to spend a whole day prepping in the kitchen. Instead she focuses on easily executed dishes, many of which she features on her blog, Piggy&rsquos Cooking Journal. This recipe for pork belly braised in Coca-Cola is deliciously salty-sweet and can even be made a day ahead of time.

1 daikon, peeled and cut into ½-inch thick slices
2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
8 ¼-inch slices peeled fresh ginger
2 green onions, roots trimmed and cut into long strips, plus more for garnish
5 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
1 lb. pork belly, skin removed, cut into 3/4-inch-thick slices
¼ cup light soy sauce
½ cup dark soy sauce
Pepper, to taste
3 Tbsp. rice wine
1 ½ cups Coca-Cola
4 ¼ cups water
1 carrot, peeled and cut into ½-inch thick slices

Bring a medium saucepan of water to a boil. Add the daikon, reduce heat to medium and simmer for 20 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Heat a wok over medium-high heat and add the vegetable oil. When the oil is heated, add ginger, spring onion and garlic cloves. Sauté until aromatic. Add the sliced pork belly and continue sautéing for four minutes. Add the light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, pepper and rice wine. Transfer the ingredients to a clay pot (a medium soup pot may also be used) and add the Coca-Cola and water. Cover and bring just to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Add carrot slices and reserved daikon and simmer for additional 30 minutes. Remove pot from heat and let sit, covered, for 15 minutes. Ladle into bowls and garnish with chopped spring onions.


Chinese braised pig’s feet with soy sauce and spices

While most people refer to all four of the pig's limbs as the feet (or trotters), Chinese butchers call the front legs (which are larger, meatier and more expensive) the "hands" and the back legs (which are bonier and harder to eat) the "feet". Which of the two you use is up to you, but for both types, ask the butcher to cut them in half lengthwise, then into pieces about 4cm (1 ½in) wide. You should also have the butcher singe off any hairs left on the feet.

If you can find it, use glutinous rice wine (mijiu) for this dish it has a milder flavour than the Shaoxing rice wine commonly used.

Rinse the pig's feet under cold running water. Bring a large pot of water to the boil, add the pieces and simmer for about five minutes. Unless your pot is very large, you'll probably have to do this in batches. Drain the feet and rinse them well. Bring a fresh pot of water to the boil and repeat this process (this rids the feet of impurities).

Wash the pot. Rinse the ginger (no need to peel it) and cut it into large chunks. Put the pieces on a cutting board and lightly crush them with the side of a cleaver. Put the ginger into the pot, then add the garlic. Break the dried chillies in half, shake out and discard the seeds, then put the chillies into the pot. Add the soy sauce, rice wine, cinnamon sticks, star anise, sugar, chun pei and 1 tsp of salt into the pot, along with 600ml (2¼ cups) of water. Bring to a simmer and cook until the sugar is dissolved.

Put all the pieces of pig's feet into the pot and bring to the boil. Cover with the lid, turn down the heat and cook at a low simmer, occasionally moving around the pieces of pig's feet so they are submerged in the liquid. After about an hour, add the peanuts.

Simmer the ingredients for about three hours in total, or until the pig's feet pieces are very tender. The sauce should reduce to a sticky, light syrupy consistency if it's too thin, remove the lid when the meat is tender and continue to simmer. Taste the sauce and correct the seasonings, if necessary.

Remove the pieces of pig's feet and put them in a large serving bowl. Add the fu pei to the pot, if using, and simmer it in the sauce until soft. Ladle the sauce and fu pei over the pig's feet. Cut the spring onions into 1cm pieces and scatter them and/or fresh coriander sprigs over the ingredients before serving.


Coca-Cola braised carnitas

A few years ago, a Texas reader asked me for a carnitas recipe. I shared mine and she said that while they looked good, she was looking for one that used Coca-Cola and milk instead. She explained that she’d had them that way at a local restaurant and they were outstanding. With good intentions, I told her I’d look into it. But I became busy with other projects and sadly forgot about helping her find a recipe as well as the place where she had eaten them.

As is my tradition, each year I like to honor the teams that are playing in the Super Bowl with a timely and fun dish. Since the game is in Houston this year, I figured if I didn’t like either of the teams playing, I would celebrate my hometown. Then the Atlanta Falcons secured a slot in the game. Ordinarily, I’m not a Falcons fan but they did beat Green Bay, a team I was annoyed with since they narrowly edged out the Cowboys. Plus, the Falcons are from the South and I also have a few friends who live there, so deciding to cheer for them was an easy decision.

Now, when I think of Atlanta cuisine, two things immediately come to mind—peaches and Coca-Cola. While peaches are best served in the summer when they’re in season, there are lots of fun things you can do with Coca-Cola any time of year. And while I was pondering recipes, I remembered that carnitas request from long ago. A quick search lead me to a book called Houston Classic Mexican Recipes, which included a Coca-Cola carnitas attributed to Santos—The Taste of Mexico, which is no longer open. While I had no idea if it was the same restaurant that woman had hers, I figured it would be a good starting point in coming up with my own.

The book’s recipe called for Coke, of course. It didn’t specify Mexican Coke, but using this cane sugar version of the drink seemed like a good idea. I kept the cinnamon and milk, but swapped fresh garlic for powder and ground allspice for clove. To brighten it up, I also splashed in freshly squeezed orange juice and lime juice, and threw in some chipotle chile powder for heat and smoke.

When it came to cooking the carnitas, the book had you stirring and adding ingredients throughout the process, but I prefer my tried-and-true method, which requires little interaction. So, I threw everything into the pot at the beginning, placed it at a low simmer, and then walked away for a couple of hours. After the meat was tender, I turned up the heat to reduce the liquid, and after a few stirs, I had crisp, succulent bites of pork.

If you’re a fan of my other carnitas recipe, you may be wondering how these are different. Well, there is a more pronounced sweetness, from the Coca-Cola but also from the addition of warm spices such as cinnamon and allspice. Though that sweetness paired with the smokiness of the chipotle gives these carnitas a slight hint of bacon, which is never a bad thing at all.

These are a rich dish, which makes them perfect for winter. They’re also versatile, as you can throw them on top of nachos, spoon them into queso, or nestle them into tortillas along with guacamole and sour cream for excellent tacos. No matter how you enjoy them, however, everyone wins.


Watch the video: CamelPhat u0026 Elderbrook Cola Official Video (October 2021).