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Dairy Queen Finally Heads to NYC

Dairy Queen Finally Heads to NYC

After a riDQulously long wait, Blizzard lovers get ready

Dairy Queen CEO announces plans to open several locations starting this summer in New York City.

In the midst of this week’s sweltering heat wave, Blizzard lovers rejoice. Dairy Queen CEO John Gainor has announced plans to open several Dairy Queen locations in New York City starting this summer.

Gainor told Deirdre Bolton of Bloomsberg’s MoneyMoves that the company is excited to finally open up in New York City.

The first store is set to open in the Staten Island Ferry station before Dairy Queen hits the island of Manhattan. The exact number of locations has yet to be released but there will be multiple stores, said Gainor in a video interview.

“We signed a multi-unit agreement recently,” said Gainer in his interview with Bolton. “And hopefully by the end of this year we’ll have several units right here in Manhattan.”

The announcement comes in the midst of Bloomberg’s proposed ban at city restaurants on soft drink sales greater than 16 ounces. The ban has caused mass controversy with soft drink giant Coca-Cola seemingly leading the fight against the proposition according to Business Insider.

“We want to have options on the menu,” said Gainer during an interview at Bloomberg headquarters Thursday. “Obviously, if it’s passed, we will have to work with it.”

The Bloomberg administration proposed the plan last month in an attempt to combat the city’s rising obesity, heart disease and diabetes rates.

Dairy Queen currently has 6,200 locations in 20 countries including over 500 stores in China alone, but this summer will mark Dairy Queen’s first venture into New York City.

This announcement is so good it's riDQulous.

Sean Flynn is a Junior Writer for The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @BuffaloFlynn


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


A Look Back At The Evolution Of Dairy Queen In Photos

Whether you're from small town America or a big city, you can find Dairy Queen just about anywhere. And good thing, too, because you never know when a craving for a chocolate-dipped cone will strike. But it was a long road to fast food domination. Take a look back at how DQ became one of the most successful franchises of all time.

The idea for Dairy Queen started in a small dairy town in Illinois, many years before the eatery was actually established. It all began with John Fremont McCullough and his son Alex in 1937.

You see, in the '40s and '50s, ice cream parlors and soda shoppes were all the rage. But the McColloughs wanted to mix things up. Enter: Their invention of soft serve ice cream.

To test their formula, the father-son duo sold soft serve at a local shop owned by Sheb Noble on August 4, 1938. They ended up selling over 1,600 servings for 10 cents each in just two hours.

Although their treat was well-received, John and Alex weren't done yet. They spent the next two years creating a soft serve freezer that would distribute their ice cream at the ideal temperature.

In 1940, the first restaurant opened in Joliet, IL. Soon after, investors began operating on a franchise model and Dairy Queen expanded across the country, growing from just 10 stores in 1940 to 1,446 stores by the end of 1950. The original Dairy Queen isn't in operation today, but the building is still a landmark in Joliet.

Dairy Queen's soft serve became wildly popular. In the late '50s, the chain began expanding its menu to include hot dogs, burgers, and other hot foods.

This second iteration of the Dairy Queen logo was launched in 1958 and was used until 2001. You'll still see it on some signs today, including Brazier locations (AKA stores that sell hot food items).

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson delighted Topsham, ME, residents when he stopped his motorcade on his way to an event in nearby Lewiston to grab an ice cream for himself and Mrs. Johnson.

By the 1970s, Dairy Queen was an established fixture across the country and the chain's red logo was nationally and internationally known. Here, a branded moment is filmed for an episode of Let's Make a Deal in 1973.

A Dairy Queen customer shares his cone with his six-month-old puppy, who is a Pyrenees-Labrador mix.

One of Dairy Queen's many franchise locations in Colorado caught fire in 1978, and the local fire chief suspected arson.

The ice creamery became a popular hangout for teenagers in the '80s, especially after the introduction of the Blizzard. The soft serve treat made with mix-in toppings sparked a national craze and the chain sold over 175 million of them that year.


Watch the video: Warren Buffetts Dairy Queen Takes on 16 Handles in NYC (January 2022).