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Butterscotch drops recipe

Butterscotch drops recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Sweets
  • Boiled sweets

This recipe for Butterscotch drops produces a hard sweet that has the classic butterscotch taste. If you don't want to make it into drops, you can pour it into a greased 23x23cm pan and break it into small pieces once it is set.


Surrey, England, UK

31 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 40 Drops

  • 400g caster sugar
  • 160ml cream
  • 160ml water
  • 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 6 tablespoons butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:40min ›Extra time:20min cooling › Ready in:1hr15min

  1. Prepare two large baking sheets by lining them with aluminium foil and spraying the foil with cooking spray.
  2. Combine the sugar, cream and water in a large saucepan over medium heat and stir until the sugar dissolves.
  3. Add the cream of tartar and boil the mixture until it reaches 116 C, soft-ball stage. Add the butter and continue boiling until the mixture reaches 138 C, soft-crack stage.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the vanilla extract.
  5. Using a very small teaspoon, carefully drop spoonfuls of the hot butterscotch onto the prepared baking sheets. It is important to work quickly before the mixture begins to set. The drops will spread, so leave a bit of space in between your spoonfuls. Continue forming small butterscotch drops on the prepared sheets until you run out of the mixture or it becomes too hard to work with.
  6. Allow the drops to set at room temperature, then lift them off the baking sheet. Serve immediately, or place them in an airtight container and store at room temperature for up to two weeks.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)

Reviews in English (2)

I haven't tried this recipe yet but with regards to the comment regarding 'little hard piles of vanilla sugar'... Do this: "medium heat and stir until the sugar dissolves." before bringing it to the boil. As you are stirring tap the edge of your spoon (preferably wooden) and you will be able to hear the 'crunch' of the sugar. When you can no longer hear that crunch, then you can bring it to the boil.Hope this helps-02 Apr 2018

I just tried this I have no idea what went wrong but I now just have little hard piles of vanilla sugar does anyone have any advice to stop this from happening next time? They just fall apart-09 Dec 2014


The Spruce / Elizabeth LaBau

Butterscotch haystacks are crunchy candies featuring the great taste of toasted coconut and smooth butterscotch chips. Finish them with a drizzle of chocolate to add a finished look and delicious semi-sweet flavor.


Butterscotch Cookies in a Jar

Jar recipes and cookie in a jar mixes are a popular favorite when it comes to homemade food gifts. These Butterscotch Cookies in a Jar are taste-tested and tweaked to delicious perfection! You’ll find a free printable label on this page to help with your gift in a jar presentation.

Butterscotch Cookies Recipe –

Ingredient List:

»1/2 cup butterscotch chips
»1/2 cup crispy rice cereal
»1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
»3/4 teaspoon baking soda
»1/4 teaspoon baking powder
»1/2 cup packed brown sugar
»1/2 cup butterscotch chips
»1/2 cup rolled oats
»1/2 cup white sugar

To Make the Layered Jar Gift:

Layer ingredients in a one quart mason jar, in the order given. Screw the jar on the lid, and cover with a circle of fabric or a paper doily, held down with a rubber band. Cover the rubber band with yarn or ribbon and tie a bow.

Print the Butterscotch Cookies Label and tie on as a gift tag, or glue to the front of the jar.

Preheat oven to 350°F. In a large bowl, cream 1/2 cup butter or margarine. Add 1 egg and 3 to 4 tablespoons of water.


Leave a Review

Needed a little more cream and baked for 10 minutes. The texture is more like a biscuit than a scone. I used light brown sugar and raisins. This recipe is good but still not as good as the ones made by our local bakery, Uptown Bakers.

Easy to make, delicious to eat, ALWAYS a crowd pleaser.

I can't believe I haven't written a review of this recipe before today. This has been my go to scone recipe easily since 2006. wow, 10 years! Not only do the scones come out amazing, but if you leave out the butterscotch chips or other add-ins, you can use them for strawberry shortcake. They are delicious this way! I prepare all the ingredients the night before up to the point where all the wet items get mixed in, and leave it in the fridge over night, and the next morning add in the wet ingredients and bake. Warm scones in the AM with little effort early in the morning. It's tough to beat.

This is my standard, go to scone recipe it is very adaptable and best of all, no rolling and cutting of the dough is necessary, so less clean-up! I have made it with dried cherries or cranberries or candied ginger instead of the butterscotch morsels. I almost always use 1c. of AP flour and 1c. of white whole wheat flour. I never sift, just mix the dry ingredients in the food processor, first. Quick to make, an easy to handle dough and always delicious.


Peanut Butter Butterscotch Drops

I really had no idea what to call these so I went to Facebook and asked. I got loads of nice suggestions (thanks everyone!), but my favorite is a mishmash of the ideas: three ingredient little crunchy baskets of hope. Doesn’t that sound delightful? ) It really sums it up. They consist of just three ingredients, they’re little, they’re crunchy, and the baskets of hope was just too amazing not to include.

This is for sure the easiest recipe I’ve ever posted. You melt peanut butter and butterscotch chips and add cornflakes. That’s the whole recipe.

It’s true that these aren’t exactly, or really at all, healthy, but hey… I used natural peanut butter! That should count for something. And if you want, you could use whole grain cereal flakes. I found some from Kashi but I’ve never tried them myself.

If you don’t like the whole Easter egg cuteness thing, then just make them without. Then they’re just blobs of awesomeness but I’m sure you can cope. :)

You can make these with regular peanut butter if you like and keep them at room temperature. But with natural peanut butter, they need to be kept refrigerated. At room temperature, they got a little gooey and starting falling apart.

And as for how long they keep, I have to admit that I ate them all on the first day. I even told myself, “I’ll bring these to a friend instead of eating them all myself!” My mistake was not emailing this friend to tell her to expect some goodies. They just sat in the fridge, calling my name, and one after another, they all got eaten within a few hours. Luckily, I only made half the batch. If you have portion control issues, I’d suggest even only doing a fourth of the recipe.

After raspberry white chocolate, butterscotch is probably my favorite flavor. And I’ve never posted anything with butterscotch because it seems almost impossible to make anything even slightly healthy with butterscotch and still have it taste amazingly… butterscotch-y. What are your favorite recipes with butterscotch?


Butterscotch Drops

( 4 Votes)

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Not only does this recipe have just 3 ingredients, but it's done in 15 minutes flat, from start to finish, and it's kid approved!

What You'll Need

  • 1 (6-ounce) package butterscotch chips (see Note)
  • 1 cup dry-roasted peanuts
  • 1 cup shoestring potato sticks, broke into pieces

What to Do

  1. Melt chips in a saucepan over low heat.
  2. Stir in peanuts and potato sticks. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto wax paper, and cool completely.

Notes

Peanut butter chips offer up a good alternative to the butterscotch chips if you'd like a substitute.

Share This Recipe

Ratings & Comments

Thanks for your comment. Don't forget to share!

i make these with chow mien noodles & add 1 cup peanut butter chips, we call ,em smoothy stax

Try these with Butterscotch, Cashews and chow-mien noodles. We call them ting-a-longs.

This recipe is like the one I make using chow mein noodles. We call them Haystacks. Yummy!

We liked it and it was very easy. My grandchildren enjoyed helping me make. Thanks

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MR. FOOD TEST KITCHEN, the "Mr. Food Test Kitchen" oval, and OOH IT'S SO GOOD!! are trademarks or registered trademarks of Ginsburg Enterprises Incorporated.
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Butterscotch Drops

( 4 Votes)

You must be logged in to add a private note. Login | Register

My Notes

We are adding the recipe to your Recipe Box.

This was added to your Recipe Box.

You must be logged in to add a recipe. Login | Register

Share This Recipe

Not only does this recipe have just 3 ingredients, but it's done in 15 minutes flat, from start to finish, and it's kid approved!

What You'll Need

  • 1 (6-ounce) package butterscotch chips (see Note)
  • 1 cup dry-roasted peanuts
  • 1 cup shoestring potato sticks, broke into pieces

What to Do

  1. Melt chips in a saucepan over low heat.
  2. Stir in peanuts and potato sticks. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto wax paper, and cool completely.

Notes

Peanut butter chips offer up a good alternative to the butterscotch chips if you'd like a substitute.

Share This Recipe

Ratings & Comments

Thanks for your comment. Don't forget to share!

i make these with chow mien noodles & add 1 cup peanut butter chips, we call ,em smoothy stax

Try these with Butterscotch, Cashews and chow-mien noodles. We call them ting-a-longs.

This recipe is like the one I make using chow mein noodles. We call them Haystacks. Yummy!

We liked it and it was very easy. My grandchildren enjoyed helping me make. Thanks

Report Inappropriate Comment

Are you sure you would like to report this comment? It will be flagged for our moderators to take action.

Thank you for taking the time to improve the content on our site.

Decrease Font Size / Increase Font Size

LATEST TV RECIPE & VIDEO

Mediterranean Ravioli with Feta

Our Mediterranean Ravioli with Feta is a budget friendly way to make delicious Italian food at home! You're going to love this easy shortcut recipe.

WHAT'S HOT

You May Also Like

MR. FOOD TEST KITCHEN, the "Mr. Food Test Kitchen" oval, and OOH IT'S SO GOOD!! are trademarks or registered trademarks of Ginsburg Enterprises Incorporated.
© 2021 by Ginsburg Enterprises Incorporated.
All rights reserved.


Goldfish Drops

This month I’ve been on a no-bake treats kick! I love how easy these little sweets are to whip up and you can pretty much add any ingredient you like! I remember seeing this Betty Crocker recipe for Goldfish Drops a few years ago. My kids ate Goldfish crackers like they were going out of style when they were little. These tasty confections are similar to my recipe for No-Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Haystacks. It’s basically melting your base and adding in the various ingredients. This recipe for Goldfish Drops has butterscotch chips, original Goldfish crackers and pretzels. I’ve also made them with white chocolate chips, peanuts and vanilla Goldfish crackers.

They are sweet and a just a little bit salty thanks to the addition of the pretzels. And lots of crunch!


Rum Butterscotch Sauce

Once upon a time, butterscotch was the darling of the American sweet tooth, casting its golden glow over puddings, pies, sauces, candies, cake frostings--you name it. Now there are people who’ve never had so much as a single, sorry instant butterscotch pudding.

This must be an oversight, America. Sure, maybe your doctor doesn’t want you to eat too much of it (your dentist either), but fresh butterscotch is overwhelmingly rich, mellow and seductive. Flavorwise, it’s the boss.

In my ill-informed youth, the only butterscotch I knew was either a sauce or a pudding. When I first encountered butterscotch balls, I remember thinking, “Hey, cool, they’ve figured a way to make a butterscotch-flavored candy.”

Actually, I had it backward. Butterscotch candy had come first--the butterscotch flavor develops naturally when you boil sugar syrup and butter together to a high enough temperature to make hard candy. It’s a combination of two flavors: browned sugar, otherwise known as caramel, and browned butter. The latter results from what chemists call the Maillard reaction, in which sugars and proteins react under heat to create roasted and browned flavors.

This is why butterscotch has so often been combined with other roasted ingredients. Nuts, such as pecans, are typically roasted rum and Bourbon contain caramel maple syrup has undergone the Maillard reaction.

If anything is certain about butterscotch, it’s that this flavor was not created by design. It was a byproduct of a technique that made candy-making just about foolproof, even for people who weren’t skilled confectioners. The problem in candy-making is that once syrup has been heated higher than about 250 degrees, its natural inclination is to “seize up” as it cools, turning into rock-hard crystals rather than brittle, glassy candy. In the 17th century, French candy-makers had discovered that fat has the handy property of getting in the way of crystallization.

Acid ingredients accomplish much the same thing--in the 18th century, adding an acid such as cream of tartar to sugar syrup was called “greasing” it--by breaking some of the sucrose molecules into glucose and fructose sugar, thereby cluttering up the solution for would-be crystals. This is one reason for all the many sweet-sour hard candies, such as lemon drops and Life Savers. Probably it also explains why a lot of old-time butterscotch recipes call for a little vinegar or lemon juice, and maybe even how a bit of lemon peel flavor came to be traditional in English butterscotch candies.

Molasses retards crystallization too, by altering the ratio of glucose to fructose. Conveniently for butterscotch makers, molasses contains caramel and even some roasted Maillard-reaction flavors of its own, because it’s the byproduct of the repeated boiling by which sugar is refined in effect, it’s a very dark caramel with a distinct burnt edge and a bit of sharpness. Because molasses is so strongly flavored, butterscotch recipes rarely use it straight, only in the diluted form of brown sugar, which is basically refined sugar crystals thinly coated with molasses.

So a really cautious, or insecure, candy-maker might throw all these things into the mix: butter, an acid ingredient and molasses. As it happens, until highly refined sugar became inexpensive in the middle of the 19th century, most sugar--certainly the sort of sugar ordinary people had access to--was more or less brown, so the molasses issue pretty much took care of itself.

Though the name “butterscotch” didn’t appear until 1885, the product was probably being made in the early 18th century, maybe even before that. In “Sugar-Plums and Sherbet: The Prehistory of Sweets” (Prospect Books, 1998), Laura Mason draws attention to a brand of hard butterscotch called Everton toffee, which goes back to 1753. (The word “butterscotch” has nothing to do with Scotland, by the way. “To scotch” means to cut or score something when butterscotch candy was poured out to cool, it was “scotched” to make it easier to break into pieces later.)

In the late 19th century, Americans started making butterscotch-flavored sauce, one of the mainstays of the old-time soda fountain, and then followed up with a profusion of butterscotch pastries and other sweets. Most of them have faded, but an underground of passionate butterscotch lovers survives.

For proof, there’s Diana Dalsass’ “The Butterscotch Lover’s Cookbook” (Buttercup Press, $17.95), which gives a lot of luscious-sounding recipes, such as butterscotch streusel apple sour cream pie. Nearly all are based on crushing up butterscotch candies, though, rather than making butterscotch from scratch. The book includes a passionately researched list of sources for buying them.

Why don’t many people make butterscotch sauce or pudding today? Particularly if you don’t trouble to cook the butter to the point of browning (around 240 degrees), as some recipes don’t, it’s a splashy effect with relatively little risk of failure. Butterscotch is forgiving.

Just how forgiving is plain from the wildly differing proportions of ingredients in butterscotch sauce recipes. With fudge or fondant, the proportions always have to be about the same, but the ratio of sugar to butter in butterscotch recipes can range from 4:3 to 16:1, and the ratio of sugar to cream from 8:9 to 4:1.

In short, you could practically forget about using any recipe at all and just boil a bunch of brown sugar with some butter for a while, add cream and then boil until it was as thick as you liked.

Don’t worry. It’d be some kind of butterscotch sauce. Butterscotch rules, but it’s not exactly rocket science.


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