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Chinese Egg Tart

Chinese Egg Tart


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Spray the cups of a mini muffin pan with nonstick spray or grease with olive oil.

Lay puff pastry across a cutting board. Using a cookie cutter or the edge of a drinking glass, cut out 3-inch circles from the puff pastry, then nestle each circle into the cups of the muffin pan. Repeat with the remaining puff pastry until all cups are filled. Transfer filled muffin pan to the refrigerator.

In a large bowl, whisk together eggs and evaporated milk. Add sugar water and vanilla, and continue to whisk until well combined. Strain the mixture through a fine mesh strainer.

Preheat oven to 400F. Remove muffin pan from refrigerator. Fill each empty pastry shell almost to the top with custard, then transfer muffin pan to a sheet tray and bake for 10 minutes.

Reduce oven temperature to 350F and bake tarts for another 5 minutes, or until custard is set and slightly browned on top. Remove tarts from the oven and let cool slightly. Carefully remove each tart from the muffin pan.

In a small bowl, mix honey with orange juice until blended. Drizzle mixture over each tart and serve immediately.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.


Egg Tart (Dan Tat)

Egg tart also called egg custard tart, dan tat, dàn tǎ, dahn taht, dan that is a popular pastry in Hong Kong, as well as in Macau and mainland China.

What is a Hong Kong egg tart?

Egg tart is prepared with a pastry crust shell that is filled with an egg-based mixture. It is then baked to reach the consistency of custard or flan.

Versions of this egg tart are popular in Portugal, Brazil, the UK as well as other Asian countries.

Related Posts:

What is the origin of egg tart?

During the 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Hong Kong’s industrial development resulted in a large flow of immigrants from mainland China.

With this immigration, new types of food as well as cuisines were introduced to Hong Kong. With the island being a British colony for more than 100 years at the time, the primary cuisine had been Cantonese Chinese with Western cuisine influences.

Traditional Hong Kong cafes that sell this Western and Chinese fusion cuisine at low prices are part of Hong Kong’s identity. They are called cha chaan tengs. It is actually in these cafes that egg tarts were introduced to the British colony via the Portuguese colony of Macau, mostly to accompany afternoon tea. This is actually the best time to get those tarts, as bakeries make fresh hot batches in time for the afternoon tea tradition.

The Portuguese version

In Portugal, similar egg tarts are called pasteis de nata. However, egg tart also shares its origins with the English custard tart. Hong Kong egg tarts are however filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Also, dan tat is served piping hot and is not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving, like pastel de nata or English custard tart.

The Portuguese egg tart version, immortalized by Casa Pastéis de Belém which was the first pastry shop outside of the convent where they were created, to sell this pastry in 1837, has a very recognizable scorched top, very similar to a creme brulee. The Hong Kong style egg tart has a top that is more glassy and smooth. This is why pastéis de nata taste like slightly burnt sweet caramel and are more golden brown or sometimes scorched on top, where the Hong Kong tarts have more of a pure egg yolk taste.

The resulting Cantonese egg tart, also called dahn taht, has since become ubiquitous with Chinese bakeries as well as dim sum houses.

Famous bakery Tai Cheong Bakery in Hong Kong is now synonymous with the emblematic egg tart. The bakery that has been opened since 1954, sells more than 3,000 tarts everyday in each of their twelve locations.

In Hong Kong, there are really two main versions of these egg tarts: one with puff pastry (酥皮底), the other one with shortcrust pastry (牛油皮底). I decided to make the tart version with shortcrust pastry, as well as butter although a number of traditional recipes call for lard.

In Guangzhou (formerly known as Canton), egg tarts are now one of the most iconic dim sum dishes offered in dim sum houses. You can order 3 types of these tarts: dan tat (egg tart), pastel de nata (also called Portuguese tart), or coconut tart.



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