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A Fattier Salad Dressing Could Mean a More Nutritious Salad

A Fattier Salad Dressing Could Mean a More Nutritious Salad


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A Purdue University study found that certain fats in salad dressings could boost your body’s absorption of the salad’s nutrients — which means some of those low-fat dressings might prevent your body from absorbing the maximum amount of vitamins and minerals in your salad. Now, before you go out and buy the biggest bottle of ranch you can find, let us clarify: When we say fats, we mean the healthy kind.

Researchers gave 29 participants salads with three different types of salad dressings — butter (saturated fat), canola oil (monounsaturated fat), and corn oil (polyunsaturated fat) — and tested how much of the salads’ carotenoids were absorbed into the body when served with dressings containing 3 grams, 8 grams, or 20 grams of fat. They found that monounsaturated fat-rich dressings required the least amount of fat to get the most carotenoid absorption, while saturated fat and polyunsaturated fat dressings required higher amounts of fat to get the same benefit, according to ScienceDaily.

The more polyunsaturated fats in a dressing, the more carotenoids were absorbed. The amount of nutrients absorbed into the bloodstream didn’t change with fat dosage in the monounsaturated-fat dressings; just as many nutrients were absorbed with a 3-gram serving of monounsaturated fats as a 20-gram serving. And saturated fats were slightly dose-dependent, but didn’t show as much of a difference in absorption with dosage as researchers noticed in polyunsaturated fats.

Hopefully your salad dressing doesn’t contain high amounts of saturated fat anyway, even if it does increase your body’s absorption of nutrients; they’re not as bad as trans fats, but you should definitely keep them to a minimum in your diet. Diets high in saturated fat have been linked to coronary heart disease. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends Americans consume less than 10 percent of daily calories as saturated fats.

Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, on the other hand, can have positive health effects when eaten in moderation. As long as you’re not consuming too much, they can help reduce bad cholesterol and lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. Plus, polyunsaturated fats offer omega-6 and omega-3, essential fats that your body needs but can’t produce itself.

"If you want to utilize more from your fruits and vegetables, you have to pair them correctly with fat-based dressings," said Mario Ferruzzi, the study’s lead author and a Purdue associate professor of food science. "If you have a salad with a fat-free dressing, there is a reduction in calories, but you lose some of the benefits of the vegetables."

The study, which was published online in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, suggests that if you’re looking for a low-fat salad dressing option, you should choose one with monounsaturated fats since you’re going to get just as many nutrients from the low-fat version as you would from the high-fat version. But if you’d prefer a healthy salad dressing that helps you get the most nutrients out of your salad, you might opt for a salad dressing higher in polyunsaturated fats.

"Overall, pairing with fat matters," Feruzzi said. "You can absorb significant amounts of carotenoids with saturated or polyunsaturated fats at low levels, but you would see more carotenoid absorption as you increase the amounts of those fats on a salad."

— Melissa Valliant, HellaWella

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What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Salad Every Day

As far as foods go, salad has a superstar reputation: it's practically the poster child for weight loss and healthy eating. Whether you're trying to up your intake of fruits and veggies, want to shed pounds, or simply want a filling meal that'll fuel you while curbing cravings, you can't go wrong with a salad. But what happens to your body when you eat salad every day? We spoke with Gina Keatley, a certified dietitian and nutritionist at Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy in New York City, to find out.

According to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, you should be eating five servings (or 2 1/2 cups of a mix of vegetables) per day. Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only one in ten American adults actually eat their recommended amount of veggies per day. Sounds pretty bleak, right? But eating a salad every day is an easy peasy way to solve that problem—as long as you're "eating the rainbow" with a diverse array of vegetables.

"Salads are generally low-starch foods that will help you to regulate your blood sugar better," says Keatley. "But not all salads are created equal."

As Keatley points out, some fast food salads can pack more than 2,000 calories—or your entire day's worth.

"Just because there are some greens in it doesn't mean it is going to be appropriate for your goals," she adds.

In other words, salads can be a healthy staple in your diet, but if you're eating them daily, you should be mindful of your ingredients and portion sizes (especially where dressing and fats are concerned).

With all of that in mind, read on to find out what effects that daily salad can have on your body and overall health. And for even more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.



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