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In Season: Artichokes Slideshow

In Season: Artichokes Slideshow


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April 24, 2013

Farro with Artichokes and Herb Salad

Chef Jonathon Sawyer of Cleveland's Greenhouse Tavern uses jarred marinated artichokes in his salad, but when artichokes are in season, you can also try using fresh artichoke hearts instead.

Click here to see the Farro with Artichokes and Herb Salad Recipe.

Roasted Veal Chop with Artichokes and Black Trumpet Ragù

Laurent Tourondel's veal chop recipe combines artichokes and cream, a classic combination.

Click here to see the Roasted Veal Chop with Artichokes and Black Trumpet Ragù Recipe.

Roasted Artichoke Hearts with Potatoes and Olive Oil

Diane Kochilas, author of The Country Cooking of Greece, shares a springtime country dish from the island of Milos in Greece.

Click here to see the Roasted Artichoke Hearts with Potatoes and Olive Oil Recipe.

Charred Artichokes with Smoky Lemon Aioli

Richard Blais, author of Try This at Home, encourages home cooks to try his recipe, which works just as well with baby artichokes as it does large globe artichokes.

Click here to see the Charred Artichokes with Smoky Lemon Aioli Recipe.

Grilled Artichokes

Jothan Yeager, who is The Bald Gourmet, goes over the finer points of grilling artichokes in his detailed yet easy-to-follow recipe.

Click here to see the Grilled Artichokes Recipe.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


The Best Canned Vegetable You're Probably Overlooking

Canned artichokes are the pantry vegetable hero we all need on deck.

Do you have a can (or jar) of artichokes in your pantry right now? You should. But you probably don&apost, because somewhere in the eighties or nineties, canned artichokes went the way of sun dried tomatoes and became suddenly uncool. We all love fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, glowing with health and that home-from-the-farmer&aposs market unprocessed superiority. Sure, unprocessed food is great. But you know what I really don&apost want to process myself? Artichokes.

No, I&aposm leaving those spiky, low-yield orbs to the professionals in restaurant kitchens and the machines in vegetable processing plants. Some things are just not worth doing in your own home. One thing that is worth doing, though? Cracking open a can of artichokes in all their tangy, tender, endlessly adaptable glory.

If I tried, I think I could incorporate canned artichokes into every meal. The most obvious place to start is dinner, by draining the hearts, roughly chopping them, and then adding them to a simple pasta. Perhaps thisਊglio e olio, one of the great pantry pastas and an excellent jumping-off point for, well, almost any meal you can think of. Want something with a little more heft? What aboutਊ baked pasta inspired by everyone&aposs favorite spinach artichoke dip?

But the possibilities go far beyond pasta. Even the most simply canned artichokes, held in nothing but water and salt, have a tangy acidity that makes them an excellent addition to rich, hearty dishes as well as vegetable sides. Add a few cans to the skillet in a seared and roasted chicken thigh dish, with maybe a splash of white wine and a little garlic, and they&aposll melt down into a side dish that feels far fancier than its canned beginnings might indicate. Toss them into to a salad to add a meaty texture oil-packed artichokes are especially good for this, as you can simply drizzle the oil directly onto the greens for a ready-made dressing. Simply adjust the seasoning to your liking with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice.

Canned artichokes are also a lunchtime hero: Try chopping and stirring them into a quick meal like chicken or tuna salad, or even let them replace the protein altogether as a vegetarian option. Chop them even finer and use them as a flavor-bomb of a spread on a regular ham or turkey sandwich. Even simpler, include them as a side snack on your next cheese or charcuterie board. the salt and acidity makes them an excellent palate cleanser, perfect for pairing with fatty meats and cheeses. The options are limited only by your creativity.

So what are you waiting for? Add canned artichokes to your shopping list.


Watch the video: Artichoke and Mascarpone Agnolotti - Carinos Italian (May 2022).


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