Other

Bill Clinton, Marcus Samuelsson Announce Harlem EatUp 2015

Bill Clinton, Marcus Samuelsson Announce Harlem EatUp 2015


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

President Bill Clinton, Mayor Bill de Blasio, and Marcus Samuelsson have announced the May 2015 debut of the new Harlem EatUp! Festival, a three-day celebration of the food, music, and arts that will honor the spirit of Harlem.

Founded by chef Samuelsson in collaboration with Herb Karlitz, the festival will benefit Harlem Park to Park, a community program that works to sustain the culture of Harlem with the help of more than seventy local businesses, and Citymeals-on-Wheels, which brings food directly to the homes of elderly New York City residents.

President Bill Clinton, who set up his personal foundation and office in Harlem after leaving the White House in 2000, and remains an active member of the community, will serve as the festival’s honorary chair.

“This is a great day for our city,” said President Clinton.“I believe that the Harlem EatUp! Festival will lift all of Harlem in ways that will not only have permanent economic benefits, but also showcase all of the culture this community has to offer.”

D Dipasupil/Getty Images for Harlem EatUp! Festival

The full line-up will be announced closer to the festival, and will include both ticketed and free culinary, music, and artistic events. Follow the festival on Facebook and Twitter for more details.

“The magic and hospitality that I feel here every day in Harlem is what we aim to convey with the Harlem EatUp! Festival,” said Marcus Samuelsson. “The festival will be in and of the community, reaching beyond the culinary world to be a true celebration of the entire neighborhood.”

Steve Aiello, Tren'Ness Woods-Black, Chef Aaron Sanchez, Marcus Samuelsson, Chef Daniel Boulud, Mayor Bill de Blasio, Herb Karlitz and Chef Jonathan Waxman attend at Red Rooster Harlem. (Photo: D Dipasupil/Getty Images for Harlem EatUp! Festival)

Karen Lo is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


Bill Clinton, Marcus Samuelsson Announce Harlem EatUp 2015 - Recipes

Harlem receives some presidential treatment this week as former President Bill Clinton, along with celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson and others, have announced the Harlem EatUp! festival.

Scheduled for 2015, the three-day festival is described as a showcase of a “cultural tapestry” of food and art that will feature music and sports and will highlight the neighborhood’s flourishing foodie culture.

An event held at Samuelsson’s Red Rooster restaurant brought out the former president, whose offices are located in Harlem, Tren’ness Woods-Black of Sylvia’s Restaurant, Mayor Bill de Blasio and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. Samuelsson is partnering with Herb Karlitz, president of Karlitz and Company.

“The community is just right for something like this right now,” Samuelsson said. “With all of the new restaurants that are coming in, we thought it was a perfect balance of new and old. We want to keep the price of the event affordable. We’ve been working on this for six months, and we also need a year to build it. We want to do it the right way.”

Clinton is serving as an honorary chair for the festival. A who’s who of Harlem are serving as ambassadors and sitting on the steering committee, including Richard Parsons, Barbara Askins of the 125th Street Business Improvement District, Khalil Muhammad of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Jonelle Procope of the Apollo Theater, Bevy Smith and Curtis Archer of the Harlem Community Development Corporation.

The festival will benefit Citymeals-on-Wheels and Harlem Park to Park. The Clinton Foundation is a supporting partner, and so far, EY (formerly Ernst & Young) and L&M Development Partners have signed on corporate sponsors.

Cooking Light and Health magazines have signed on as media sponsors.

“This community has a reputation well-deserved of being service oriented,” Clinton said. “We’re excited about this. This festival is about food, but it’s also about the culture of Harlem. Thousands and thousands and thousands of people will come here. This is a way of lifting this whole neighborhood in a way that I think will have permanent benefits economically for the people who live here.”

De Blasio said that the festival will serve as a symbol of Harlem’s diversity and inclusion.

“You have representation of so much that’s good, strong and vibrant about Harlem uniting generations of Harlemites with everything that’s happening today. It’s incredibly exciting,” said de Blasio.

Lloyd Williams, president and CEO of the Harlem Chamber of Commerce, said the organization strongly supports the festival. The Chamber oversees Harlem Week, another critical event to the community.

“It’s very important for Harlem tourism and captures the great growth and the restaurant in the community of Harlem,” he said.

While there appears to be much praise over the event, some in the community are buzzing that the event is not going to benefit the community. Some feel the festival will take away from other long standing, established festivals in the neighborhood.

Between now and next year, there will be pop-up events leading up to the festival. Several restaurants, including Sylvia’s, Melba’s and 67 Orange Street, have announced their participation in Harlem EatUp!


Bill Clinton, Marcus Samuelsson Announce Harlem EatUp 2015 - Recipes

You’ve seen it. Maybe you have even tasted it. With all of the new and different eateries and restaurants opening, Harlem is fast becoming a food destination beyond our signature soul food. Well, the time has come for Harlem to get its food due and let it shine, shine, shine in a spotlight to be cast next year.

Chefs Sanchez, Waxman, Boulud

Last week at a press conference held at Red Rooster, chef and restauranteur Marcus Samuelsson (@marcuscooks), along with partner Herb Karlitz (@herbatKarlitz) of the public relations and events company Karlitz and Company (@Karlitz_co) announced the first annual Harlem EatUp! festival (@HarlemEatUp), to take place May 15-17, 2015! The three-day festival will highlight the food, entertainment and arts that represent the spirit of Harlem while paying homage to its roots and cultural fabric.

The room was packed to the hilt with local celebrities and dignitaries, as well as news and media outlets, all in anticipation of the event. Samuelsson’s excitement was palpable. “The magic and hospitality that I feel here every day in Harlem is what we aim to convey with the Harlem EatUp! festival,” he said. “[I’m] also inspired by the art, music and culture that make Harlem so vibrant. The festival will be in and of the community, reaching beyond the culinary world to be a true celebration of the entire neighborhood.”

Honorary Festival Chair President Bill Clinton and special guest Mayor Bill de Blasio joined Samuelsson and Karlitz for the announcement alongside Tren’ness Woods-Black of Harlem’s legendary Sylvia’s Restaurant. “This is a great day for our city,” said Clinton. “I believe that the Harlem EatUp! festival will lift all of Harlem in ways that will not only have permanent economic benefits, but also showcase all of the culture this community has to offer.”

Karlitz knows about festivals like Harlem EatUp!, as he and his team have been responsible for the putting on the annual New York City Wine & Food Festival every year, among many other festivals. “It is tremendously gratifying to be helping to bring to life this exciting new festival that will celebrate Harlem and the people at its heart,” he said.

Samuelsson takes questions

With events like a private dinner at the exclusive East Harlem restaurant Rao’s on the schedule, the festival will take a lot of money and involve a lot of planning. Karlitz noted, while funding for the festival is still ongoing, EY (formerly Ernst & Young) has stepped in as a founding sponsor with $250,000. Media sponsors Cooking Light and Health magazines will promote and showcase Harlem EatUp!

Most importantly, the beneficiaries of this great event will be Citymeals-on-Wheels and Harlem Park to Park. Citymeals-on-Wheels (www.citymeals.org) has been feeding and caring for older New Yorkers since 1981, providing a continuous lifeline of nutritious food and human company to the city’s homebound elderly. In East, West and Central Harlem, Citymeals provides over 178,840 nutritionally balanced meals to 1,315 meal recipients each year, serving 136,760 weekend meals and 42,080 emergency and holiday meals, including deliveries on Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Herb Karlitz and Marcus Samuelsson answer questions

Harlem Park to Park is a community improvement association and business alliance formed in September 2009. Its mission is to encourage commerce that successfully sustains and promotes the community and culture of the village of Harlem and celebrates the neighborhood’s historic “CHARM”: community and culture, heritage and hospitality, art and architecture, retail and restaurants and music. Its membership is comprised of 70-plus premiere businesses located within the geographic area of Central Park North to 130th Street and Morningside Park to Marcus Garvey Park.

Samuelsson called in some of his chef friends from Harlem and beyond for support. Chefs Daniel Boulud (@DanielBoulud), Jonathan Waxman (@ChefJWaxman) of Barbuto and Aaron Sanchez (@Chef_Aaron) huddled together in the corner to discuss. The Harlem owners of Bier, Sylvia’s, 67 Orange Street, among others are eagerly anticipating the festival and what there is to come. Melba Wilson, owner of Melba’s, said, “I look forward to the festival and helping to promote the smaller businesses of Harlem.”

So be forewarned and get ready for Harlem EatUp! It is bound to be delicious and found only in Harlem!


Marcus Off Duty

In Marcus Off Duty, chef, award-winning author and TV host Marcus Samuelsson steps out of the restaurant and into his home kitchen, where he teaches readers to cook global, flavorful and approachable recipes. It’s a beautiful book, filled with funky illustrations, stories, personalized playlists, and his tips and tricks for tackling ethnic cuisines at home. Below, we talk with Samuelsson about his new cookbook, why it’s important to go off the grid on vacation and what he thinks about Minneapolis.

AndrewZimmern.com: This cookbook seems really personal, almost like a journal with the scribbled notes on the side. Why did you decide to go this route versus a more formal restaurant cookbook?

Marcus Samuelsson: Well, two things. When I started cooking, it was at home. I also feel, as a chef, I want to share my journey and the lessons I’ve learned. Once you know how to cook, it’s very liberating and I wanted to share that with people. And I think that sometimes you need a bridge, and I want this book to be the bridge and encourage people. “Oh I haven’t cooked with coconut milk, what is that?” Well it’s in here. “Can I use kimchi and not do Korean food?” Yes you can. You can use miso in a non-Japanese dish. Sometimes you just need that door opened and I feel like Off Duty can do that.

This book took three years to do. At that point Red Rooster was only a year old. I worked eight years at Aquavit before we dared to do a cookbook. Gramercy Tavern just came out with a cookbook. It takes a little bit more character and I think we’re going to age well.

AZ.com: The notes on the side of each recipe are coaxing people to experiment beyond the recipe. Why did you decide to do that and why is it important to improvise?

MS: Because so much of life is an in-between stage. I felt like a recipe has to be, not formal, but pretty structured, and the good stuff is right in-between. Isn’t life just a little better when you feel like you’ve been let in on a really good tip or advice? That’s what that is, it’s like one of those ‘Did you know’ moments.

AZ.com: There are a lot of recipes and tips for cooking with kids. How young were when you first started to cook or show interest in the kitchen?

MS: Very early on. When we were with family, we made simple things like meatballs and ginger snap cookies. As we got older, we learned to pickle and preserve. I grew up on the water so fishing was something you just knew how to do, and fishing means you have to know how to butcher the fish. You know, they throw you in the water and you learn how to swim. I grew up in a way where land and nature was part of life. Mushroom hunting, picking lingonberries, preserving blueberries, were all just part of life. Then I was a teenager when I went to cooking school.

AZ.com: The cookbook is filled with the faces of those who’ve influenced you. Who are these people that you’ve focused on?

MS: Wow, that’s a great question. There are a lot of people, a lot of cooks, and a lot of artisans that are anonymous but they are incredible and very relevant and important in their community. And they come to it from every walk of life, but they come to it with a very smart character and the will to make great stuff for their community. America is so diverse and it’s never been more delicious. I wanted to show that this book is a celebration of the great food in this country, so when you think there’s not good food in your community, I challenge you, there is. Just go and find it, because there are amazing families that are invested in this and you are the benefiter. It’s there.

AZ.com: As a frequent world traveler, where have you been recently that has surprised or impressed you?

MS: I’m loving LA as a food town for its diversity, with little Thai town, incredible Mexican food of course, and also K-town. I love a place like San Francisco–which is known for its restaurants–but I challenge you to try a place like Richmond, where you have food from Burma and a German bakery right next to each other. That’s something to celebrate, only in America can that happen. When you go to these cities, go off the grid and go to a real neighborhood. I mean we all know what’s happening in Austin, but have you thought about Houston? It’s also a great food town. Do some research online. It’s not just coastal, it’s happening across the country.

AZ.com: You’re no stranger to Minneapolis, what do you think of the food scene here?

MS: Gavin Kaysen opened his restaurant and that’s really big. Gavin is a true chef, a young man with an old soul. Five to ten years from now you’re going to have very good chefs coming out of that kitchen. That’s what you get out of a restaurant besides the medium, you get a whole family tree of young cooks opening restaurants in other parts of the city and that’s how neighborhood restaurants improve.

Get Samuelsson’s recipe for Roast Chicken from his new book Marcus Off Duty.

About Marcus Samuelsson

Award-Winning Chef, Restaurateur & Author Chef Marcus Samuelsson is an internationally acclaimed chef who has thrilled the food scene with a blend of culture and artistic excellence. Marcus caught the attention of the culinary world at Aquavit. During his tenure as executive chef, he received an impressive three-star rating from the New York Times, the youngest person ever to receive such an accolade.

In addition to being a successful cookbook author, Marcus released his New York Times Bestseller and James Beard-wining memoir Yes, Chef in 2012 to rave reviews. He has been featured on a number of media platforms including Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, the Martha Stewart Show, Today Show, Regis and Kelly, and Charlie Rose. Marcus was the winner on Bravo’s Top Chef Masters Season Two as well as the second season of Chopped All-Stars. Marcus also serves as a recurring judge for Chopped, one of Food Network’s highest-rated series with a following of over 20 million viewers a month, and serves as a mentor on ABC’s The Taste, guiding a team of new culinary talent through a series of challenges. Marcus will host a new original show on FYI network titled The Feed starting in July of 2014 alongside Gail Simmons and comedian Max Silvestri.

In 2009, Marcus was honored as a guest chef at the White House under the Obama Administration, where he planned and executed the administration’s first state dinner for the first family, Prime Minister Singh of India and 400 of their guests. He has been a UNICEF ambassador since 2000, focusing his advocacy on water and sanitation issues, specifically the Tap Project. Marcus also had the honor of speaking at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland and TEDxHarlem in 2012. In the fall of 2012, Marcus was also named to the US State Department’s The American Chef Corps, a group of chefs committed to Secretary State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s message of “smart power” diplomacy, which embraces the use of a full range of diplomatic tools, by utilizing food, hospitality and the dining experience as ways to enhance how formal diplomacy is conducted, cultivating cultural understanding and strengthening bilateral relationships through the shared experience of food.

His iconic Red Rooster Harlem celebrates the roots of American cuisine in one of New York City’s liveliest and culturally rich neighborhoods. It has earned two-stars from the New York Times and countless accolades for its food, style and connection to the community. Named the Best Neighborhood Joint by Time Out New York, Red Rooster continues to amaze Harlem with the opening of its downstairs supper club Ginny’s. Marcus is also the chef behind Norda Grill in Gothenburg, Sweden, American Table and the Kitchen and Table concept all partnered with Clarion Hotels.


Bill Clinton & NY Mayor Bill De Blasio Announce Harlem EatUp! Food Festival

New York’s Mayor De Blasio and President Bill Clinton joined restaurateurs Marcus Samuelsson (Red Rooster) and Tren’ness Wood-Black (Sylvia’s) to announce a new food festival coming to Harlem in May of 2015. “Harlem EatUp!” is a new three-day festival in Harlem, NY celebrating food, culture, and spirit of Harlem.

“Today is a big day for us,” Samuelsson told the crowd gathered in the downstairs lounge of his restaurant The Red Rooster. “We feel like this is such an exciting time to live in Harlem and this food festival will have art, food, music and celebrate the great people of Harlem.”

Signature events will include a dine out dinner series, culinary demonstrations, panel discussion and a Sunday afternoon block party.

“This is the place where thousands of people come to NY to see what our culture is all about and we’re so excited that we now have this platform and our festival to showcase the best of the best,” added Tren’ness Wood-Black, granddaughter of Sylvia Woods who founded the famous eatery that bears her name.

“This festival is about food but it’s also about the culture of Harlem,” said Clinton, who opened an office in Harlem after he left office. “Thousands of people will come here and hear music they would not have heard, hear poetry they would not have heard, go to museums they would not have visited. They will see our famous churches that they’ve only heard about. This is a way of lifting this whole neighborhood that will have permanent benefits economically for the people who live here and be very good for the way we feel about ourselves and the way other people see this whole endeavor.”

“Because he has to stay in touch with his roots he needs as much Southern cuisine as he can get,” Mayor De Blasio quipped of The President. “It really epitomizes why the HarlemEatUp! Festival matters…Harlem has meant so much to the people of this city. It is globally famous for good reason and continues to get strong and vibrant in so many ways.”

Karl Franz Williams, owner of Harlem bar 67 Orange and founding member of Harlem Park to Park feels that is a good thing for Harlem and New York.


Related stories

Samuelsson started working in a restaurant as a teenager and later enrolled in cooking schools in Sweden. Afterward, he apprenticed at restaurants in Switzerland and Austria. From there, he got a job offer in the U.S. at a popular Swedish restaurant called Aquavit as the second-in-command.

According to CNBC, Samuelsson arrived in the U.S. with only $300 in his wallet, a move he describes as risky but says he was later inspired by the diversity of food options in cities such as New York and the Bronx. This would later inspire his desire to establish his own restaurant.

Samuelsson was asked to take over as head of Aquavit following the demise of the restaurant’s head chef. “I was nervous,” he says. “I didn’t want to be the one to take a famous restaurant like Aquavit down. All my buddies in Sweden would know about that. But I also knew that if I worked really hard, I could do it. … And we just kept cooking and hiring cooks. … Eventually our tribe of misfits became our strongest weapon, and we developed this crew, and one day we got three stars from The New York Times.”

By 1997, he was made a partner of Aquavit and within a decade, he opened branches of the company in Stockholm, Tokyo and a Japanese-influenced restaurant called Riingo in New York. His restaurant, Red Rooster, which is located in Harlem, later followed in 2010. “It took me 25 years to build this and 10 days to break it down,” Samuelsson says of his restaurant empire which was hit by the coronavirus.

His restaurant empire was fetching him about $75 million in annual revenue, however, the coronavirus pandemic led to a drop in the company’s revenue by some 80%.

Like any other successful entrepreneur or businessman, Samuelsson had to navigate many obstacles before getting to where he is. He recalls how one of the restaurants he opened targeting the African-American community and the Caribbean failed. Merkato 55, which was located at Manhattan’s trendy Meatpacking District, closed a year after it was opened. “I didn’t know how much African [cuisine], how much Blackness to feature on the menu at Merkato 55,” he told CNBC.

Samuelsson is not only an internationally acclaimed chef but also an accomplished author of several cookbooks, including the James Beard award-winning “The Soul of a New Cuisine” and “Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home.”

Other written titles by Samuelson are “Aquavit” and the “New Scandinavian Cuisine, “En Smakresa (A Journey of Tastes),” and “Street Food.” Samuelson is a visiting Professor of International Culinary Science at the Umea University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts in Sweden. He is also the founder of the acclaimed website Food Republic.

Samuelsson was the winner of Bravo’s “Top Chef Masters Season Two” as well as the second season of “Chopped All-Stars.” He has also had a recurring role as a judge for “Chopped,” one of Food Network’s highest-rated series with a following of more than 20 million viewers a month, and was a mentor on ABC’s “The Taste,” guiding a team of new culinary talent through a series of challenges.

He has been featured on CNN, MSNBC’s “The Dylan Ratigan Show,” “Iron Chef USA,” Iron Chef America,” and “Today.” In 2009, he was selected as a guest chef at the White House under the Obama Administration, where he planned and executed the administration’s first state dinner honoring Prime Minister Manmohan Singh of India.

Samuelsson has contributed immensely to philanthropic endeavors, including serving as a UNICEF Ambassador, serving as a member of the U.S. State Department’s Chef Corps, and serving as the co-chairman for the organization Careers Through Culinary Arts Program, which works with public schools across the country to prepare underserved high school students for college as well as provide career opportunities in the restaurant and hospitality industry.

As an international patron of the arts, Samuelsson is honored to be a board member for both the Apollo Theater and the Museum of Modern Art.

Samuelsson married Maya Haile in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and resides in Harlem, New York. Samuelsson partnered with Karilitz and Company, with the support of Mayor Bill De Blasio, former President Bill Clinton, and Tren’ness Woods-Black to co-produce Harlem EatUp!, a food and culture festival in Harlem in May 2015, which returned for a second year in May 2016.

Samuelsson was recently inducted into the James Beard Foundation’s “Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America.”


Harlem Eatup! Might Just Be a Populist Food Festival

It’s rare that a food event has so many different goals, but stakeholders from all sides of the equation seemed satisfied with the turnout.

When Bill Clinton was in his twenties, he lived a few years in the United Kingdom. When he flew home, he would take a bus from the airport to Harlem and walk the length of 125th street. May 14 through 17 was Harlem’s inaugural Harlem EatUp! Festival, and no one in the crowd was expecting to see President Clinton return on Saturday May 16. Standing on the stage in Morningside Park, Clinton said, “Harlem is about music, the churches and the small businesses. But nothing characterizes this neighborhood more than the food.”

And he was right. There was a palpable sense of surprised delight from the planners and attendees.

It’s rare that a food event has so many different goals: Celebrate the community, attract chef and diner attention from other parts of the city, offer education and guidance to culinary students and small business owners, all while shining a spotlight on restaurants and vendors new to cooking for a five-hour ticketed tasting event. But stakeholders from all sides of he equation seemed satisfied with the turnout, the management and content of the events.

The price of Saturday’s major event, a tasting party called “The Stroll,” has been a point of contention. A $75 to $150 ticket is a tough hurdle for many neighborhood residents. But, for a full tasting experience including an entire tent of beer, wine and spirits vendors, the price tag looks kind. Compared to the price of similar events like the South Beach Food and Wine Festival (an inspiration for the event), it’s affordable.

Leslie Pitterson, a Harlem resident who stayed in the neighborhood after getting her master’s degree at Columbia, said that she thought the price for the Saturday’s tasting and drinks tents was a fair price. “For the selection at the tents, the cost was reasonable, “said Pitterson, “There were so many vendors there and I got to try a lot of the signature dishes from restaurants that I love and ones I haven’t checked out yet.”

Saturday’s culinary demos were free to the public as well as all activities on Sunday, though the food in the tents was for purchase instead of all included, with plates ranging from four to seven dollars.

The food

The festival included seventeen dinners that brought guest chefs from other parts of New York and the US to cook with Harlem’s staple restaurant chefs at venues like The Cecil, Sylvia’s and Marcus Samuelsson’s newest joint Streetbird.

But the main attraction were Saturday and Sunday’s tasting tents. Standouts included shrimp and grits from Harlem Shake’s brunch menu, Samuelsson’s own jerk chicken tacos from Red Rooster, a refreshing spring pea soup shooter from the Sylvia Center, a prosciutto wrapped shaved asparagus salad from The Grange Bar & Eatery and the ceviche with plantain chips from Harlem Tavern.

Culinary demos too, were a big part of the weekend. Samuelsson performed a high energy demo with chef Aaron Sanchez, author of La Comida del Barrio, where Samuelsson was quite literally a cheerleader while shouting from the demo stage, “Would you rather eat uptown or downtown?” with crowd answering “Uptown!”

“Would you rather eat in Brooklyn or uptown?” he said — “Uptown!”

Sanchez, who made a salmon dish with the help of a young girl from the crowd said, “Harlem is a culinary mecca and you need to come up here and check it out.”

The conversation

Saturday was not only a day of eating, but also a day of discussion. The Studio Museum in Harlem was the home of Harlem Talks: a panel discussions on a variety of topics from a day in the life of a chef to how food businesses can serve the community.

The panels were lightly attended, but the engagement between audience and speakers was enthusiastic and specific, with questioners coming in from the Bronx and Long Island.

At arguably the most star-studded panel “A Day in the Life of a Chef,” featuring Scott Conant, Alex Guarnaschelli, Joseph JJ Johnson, Michael White and Samuelsson, and hosted by Ted Allen, a young culinary student from the Bronx stood up and asked Samuelsson how to get onto the culinary scene at his level. He told her to come to Red Rooster at 9:30 a.m. on Monday morning and “stage,” or apprentice.

At the “How to Open a Restaurant” panel, the room was filled with a diverse group asking intelligent questions about trends in fast casual concepts and how to transition from catering to a brick and mortar restaurant.

At the “How to Serve Your Community” panel, Jessamyn Rodriguez, founder of Hot Bread Kitchen, said that most of the applicants for her training programs want to be Aliyyah Baylor of Make My Cake fame, who was also on the panel.

The future

So the festival was a fairly uncontested hit. But when it comes to next year, organizers Nikoa Evans-Hendricks of Harlem Park to Park, an organizer and beneficiary of the festival, Marcus Samuelsson and business partner Herb Karlitz have a lot to talk about.

“This first year everything was a test. What works? Will people come?” said Evans-Hendricks. And to ask festival-goers, it seems like they passed with flying colors.

But there has been a bit of backlash from the community. On top of some disapproval of a neighborhood event with a pricetag out of range for many residents, the festival also reportedly did some damage to the park itself that could prove expensive.

“They may have to reseed the area. If they do, they have to close the area and if they don’t the park is going to look like crap for the rest of the season.” said Maurice Sessoms, a member of the Friends of Morningside Park to DNAinfo. He continued, “We don’t want the event not to be there. We just want them to respect the neighborhood.”

And the neighborhood has broader controversies to discuss than the grass in Morningside Park. Melba Wilson, of Melba’s Restaurant said that she knows of 64 black-owned businesses that have closed in the last few years. “The rent’s too damn high. It’s really sad… The people that were born and raised here can’t afford to live here.”

Growing pains are to be expected for a festival that wants to last a long time. But the fast-changing dynamics in Harlem’s business and residential communities will require this one to keep one ear to the ground if it is to stay an authentic part of the Harlem community.

“This is not for show. This is very real. This is our home. Harlem is a small town in a big city.” said Evans-Hendricks. “So for us, we’re raising our kids here, it matters to us what’s happening here.” With that kind of ethos, it seems unlikely that Harlem Eatup! will go the way of $300 tickets and tiny tasting portions, but we’ll just have to wait and see.


Chef Marcus Samuelsson Book Signing and Q&A (SOLD OUT)

ASI welcomes celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson back to Minneapolis! Chef Marcus will offer a Q&A session about his new cookbook Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook At Home which chronicles his life and travels through food, all translated into the recipes he and his wife, Maya, cook for friends and family in the small kitchen of their Harlem brownstone. Books will be available for purchase at the event.

The event is free and open to the public.

Books will be available for purchase.

In Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home (hardcover $35 Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on sale October 21) Marcus chronicles his life and travels through food, all translated into the recipes he and his wife, Maya, cook for friends and family in the small kitchen of their Harlem brownstone. What we see is a humble mash-up off flavor-packed influences, from his grandmother’s Swedish kitchen (Dill-Spiced Salmon), to New-Orlean’s inspired Chicken-Fried Steak on a Salad that he learned from his mentor Leah Chase, to 158th Street Plantanos Mash inspired by the Dominican community in the area of New York City where Harlem turns into Washington Heights. With each recipe Marcus shares its cultural influence and significance, his personal inspiration with hand-written notes and even suggests music playlists to create the ultimate home cooking experience. Think Got ‘til It’s Gone - Janet Jackson featuring Q-tip, Push It - Salt-N-Peppa, and No Time to Play - Guru’s Jazzmatazz, Ronnie Jordan. In addition to vibrant photography by Paul Brissman, whimsical illustrations by New York City based artist Rebekah Maysles, who is known for several media projects including the Sourcebook of American Chatter and the silkscreened, watercolored, and hand-drawn images woven through the book, Grey Gardens. In Marcus Off Duty, Rebekah brings Marcus Samuelsson’s stories and recipes from all over the world to life with her drawings of pantry items, dishes, utensils, and more—all crafted after countless hours of conversations with the chef.

Marcus Samuelsson is the acclaimed chef behind Red Rooster Harlem, Ginny’s Supper Club and American Table Cafe and Bar by Marcus Samuelsson a committed philanthropist and The New York Times-bestselling author of Yes, Chef. The youngest person to ever receive a three-star review from The New York Times, Samuelsson has won multiple James Beard Foundation Awards including Best Chef: New York City, and was tasked with planning and executing the Obama Administration’s first State dinner. Samuelsson was also crowned champion of television shows Top Chef Masters and Chopped, winning $115,000 for UNICEF and $50,000 for the Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP), respectively. He serves as a mentor on ABC’s The Taste and stars in FYI’s The Feed, which premiers in August of 2014. Most recently, Samuelsson partnered with Mayor De Blasio, former President Bill Clinton, and Tren’ness Wood-Black to announce Harlem EatUp!, a food and culture festival coming to Harlem, New York in May 2015.


President Bill Clinton to Kick-Off Harlem EatUp! Festival

May 13, 2015 (New York, NY) — This Saturday, May 16, President Bill Clinton, Founder of Clinton Foundation and 42nd President of the United States, will deliver remarks and kick-off the Harlem EatUp! Festival. The event, called Harlem EatUp!’s The Stroll, will be held at Morningside Park and will offer members of the community an opportunity to experience Harlem’s soulful vibe and delicious fare.

Part of The Stroll includes The Avenue of artisans and purveyors selling specialty foods while celebrity chefs and personalities inspire with exciting culinary demonstrations. The Avenue has no admission fee and is open to the public.

Culinary Demonstrations Presented by Macy’s on the Sub-Zero Wolf Stage

  • 12:15PM-1:00PM: Chefs Ludo Lefebvre and George Duran
  • 1:30PM-2:15PM: Chefs Marcus Samuelsson & Aaron Sanchez with special guest Marjorie Eliot of Jazz at Marjorie Eliot’s
  • 2:30PM-3:15PM: Cooking Light & Friends featuring Chefs Anna Bullett & Marvin Woods
  • 3:30PM-4:15PM: A Harlem Cook-Off featuring Keith Bryant, Melba’s, and Carlos Swepson, BLVD Bistro. Judges Marc Murphy, Alex Guarnaschelli, Jonelle Procope and Alexander Smalls
  • 4:30PM-5:15PM: Cooking Demo with Chef Scott Conant and Mixologist Karl Franz Williams

There’s more…The Experience at The Stroll features three tents influenced by the art, the music, the style and dance of Harlem. The Experience, a ticketed event, will hit all of your senses with signature bites from Harlem chefs and restaurants, and a selection of wines, beers and spirited drinks, while artists showcase their works. You don’t want to miss it!

The Experience at The Stroll: All tickets are available at www.HarlemEatUp.com

“VIE” (Very Important Eater) Experience at The Stroll: provides access to tasting tents, culinary demonstrations, and an opportunity to participate in Meet & Greet photo moments with visiting celebrity chefs and TV personalities. VIE guests will also receive one free Admission Pass to Studio Museum in Harlem and a copy of the museum’s magazine, Studio. One (1) Studio Museum pass admits 2 adults kids 12 & under free valid any day museum is open. *Must be 21 years old to enter The Experience at The Stroll.

Restaurants: Barawine, BLVD Bistro, Charles Country Pan Fried Chicken, Chocolat Restaurant & Lounge, Corner Social, Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, Farafina Café & Lounge Harlem, Harlem Shake, Harlem Tavern, La Bodega 47 Social Club, Lady Lexis Sweets, Lido, LoLo’s Seafood Shack, Madiba Harlem, Make My Cake, Melba’s, Ponty Bistro, Red Rooster, Seasoned Vegan, Spoonbread, The Cecil/Minton’s, The Grange, Bar & Eatery, Zoma Restaurant

Participating Artists: Alexis Duque, Alix Delinois, Uday Dhar, Anthony E. Boone, Lina Puerta, S. Whittaker

Exhibitors: Banfi, Beam Suntory, Bedell, Constellation / Franciscan, Constellation / Mondavi, Constellation / Roscato, Frederick Wildman, Heaven Hill, Palm Bay International, Pernod Richard, Tito’s Vodka

Sponsors: Artimus (110 Manhattan Equities), Amsterdam News, Bordeaux Wine Council

Cayman Islands, Citi, Cooking Light, Coors Light (Manhattan Beer), Corona Extra (Manhattan Beer), Delivery.com, Essence, Fairway Market, Great Performances , Health, iHeart Media, Macy’s, Manhattan Beer, Maui Jim, NCM, New York Times, People, Southern Wine & Spirits, Sub-Zero Wolf, Taste NY, Travel + Leisure, William Grant

About Harlem EatUp!: The inaugural Harlem EatUp! Festival will celebrate Harlem’s art, music, food, and culture this weekend! This brand new and highly anticipated festival represents the renewed spirit of Harlem while paying homage to its roots. A variety of ticketed and free events will be held throughout the weekend to feature nationally and locally renowned artists from the culinary, fine arts and performing arts worlds.

As part of its mission and dedication to Harlem, net proceeds from festival ticket sales will be donated to beneficiaries Harlem Park to Park and Citymeals-on-Wheels, two non-profit organizations that have a positive and direct impact on the Harlem community.

Harlem EatUp! is presented with generous support from the following sponsors: Founding: Citi, EY Platinum: Aetna Macy’s Gold: Bordeaux Wine Council L&M Development Partners Manhattan Beer Silver: Taste NY, Voss Supporting: The Clinton Foundation Media: Cooking Light, Essence, Health, iHeartMedia, National CineMedia (NCM), New York Amsterdam News, The New York Times, People en Español, Travel+Leisure, and WABC-TV.

The festival was first announced in May 2014 at a press conference held at Red Rooster Harlem with co-founders Marcus Samuelsson and Herb Karlitz, along with Harlem EatUp! Honorary Chair, President Bill Clinton and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Social Media Handles

Twitter: @HarlemEatUp

Instagram: @HarlemEatUp

Facebook: Facebook.com/HarlemEatUp

Festival Founders

Marcus Samuelsson Group

Founded by award-winning chef and cookbook author Marcus Samuelsson, the Group is committed to providing exceptional and distinct culinary experiences that celebrate food, music, history, culture and art. From high-end restaurants to fast-casual cafes, we are focused on creating top quality culinary experiences and food-focused media and special events. Our commitment to excellence, community and diversity is core to our beliefs and offerings. We are passionate about sharing our culinary culture as well as the culture of where we reside, in Harlem, NYC.

Karlitz & Company, Inc.

Founded in 1990 by veteran event marketer Herb Karlitz, the New York-based agency has become the leader in producing food and wine events across the country, including the Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival, Flavor! Napa Valley, The Chocolate Show, and Enjoy Arts & Tastes-St. Pete. The agency is known for creating unique experiences in the niche areas of food, wine, luxury and entertainment for a discerning roster of clients including American Express, Breeders’ Cup, Chase, EY, Food Network, and Merrill Lynch, among others. For more information, visit www.karlitz.com

HONORARY CHAIR

President Bill Clinton

Making Harlem the home of his Foundation work and his personal office after leaving the White House in 2000, President Clinton continues to be a deeply committed resident of the community. Through the work of one of his first initiatives, the Clinton Economic Opportunity Initiative, to his ongoing work to improve health and wellness, President Clinton remains one of Harlem’s most ardent champions.

The Clinton Foundation convenes businesses, governments, NGOs, and individuals to improve global health and wellness, increase opportunity for women and girls, reduce childhood obesity, create economic opportunity and growth, and help communities address the effects of climate change.

BENEFICIARIES

Citymeals-On-Wheels

Feeding and caring for older New Yorkers since 1981, Citymeals-on-Wheels (citymeals.org) provides a continuous lifeline of nutritious food and human company to the city’s homebound elderly. Citymeals works with community-based meal centers to deliver over 2 million weekend, holiday and emergency meals to 18,000 of our frail aged neighbors. In East, West and Central Harlem, Citymeals provides over 200,000 nutritionally balanced meals to 1,290 meal recipients each year, serving 134,000 weekend meals and 38,700 emergency and holiday meals including deliveries on Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Last year, more than 19,000 volunteers provided over 67,000 hours of service across the city. In Central Harlem, Citymeals launched a unique Friendly Visiting program in 2005 through which volunteers visit meal recipients in their homes on a weekly basis to combat the loneliness they experience. Volunteers have been matched with 546 isolated elderly in the neighborhood and provide 24,000 hours of service. Citymeals relies on the generosity of sponsors, its Board of Directors, the City of New York and other designated gifts to cover administrative costs. This ensures that 100% of all public donations goes directly to the preparation and delivery of meals.

Harlem Park to Park

Harlem Park to Park (HP2P) is a network of entrepreneurs committed to community development in Central Harlem, NYC’s premiere dining, shopping and nightlife hub north of 110th Street. Formed in September 2009, HP2P’s membership is comprised of more than 100 premier businesses located within the geographic area of Central Park North to 135th street and Morningside Park to Marcus Garvey Park. Its mission is to encourage commerce that successfully sustains small businesses promotes the community and culture of the Village of Harlem and celebrates the neighborhood’s historic CHARM:


This Ethiopian came to the U.S. with $300, and built a $75m restaurant empire

Marcus Samuelsson was born in a hut in rural Ethiopia. The size of the hut, he describes, was like that of two combined restaurant tables and he lived in it with six other persons. When he was only three years, he and his sister survived tuberculosis but the disease claimed his mother’s life.

He was adopted by Swedish couple Ann Marie and Lennart Samuelsson and soon learned how to cook from his adopted grandmother Helga, Samuelsson says in his memoir, “Yes, Chef”, which pays a glowing tribute to his Swedish family.

“We were jarring, pickling, there was always a bowl of chicken soup ready to be served, there was always sausage ready to be made,” he says, according to NPR. “She [Helga] was incessant all year round with cooking. … It was really in those rituals that my love for food was built.”

Samuelsson started working in a restaurant as a teenager and later enrolled in cooking schools in Sweden. Afterward, he apprenticed at restaurants in Switzerland and Austria. From there, he got a job offer in the U.S. at a popular Swedish restaurant called Aquavit as the second-in-command.

According to CNBC, Samuelsson arrived in the U.S. with only $300 in his wallet, a move he describes as risky but says he was later inspired by the diversity of food options in cities such as New York and the Bronx. This would later inspire his desire to establish his own restaurant.

Samuelsson was asked to take over as head of Aquavit following the demise of the restaurant’s head chef. “I was nervous,” he says. “I didn’t want to be the one to take a famous restaurant like Aquavit down. All my buddies in Sweden would know about that. But I also knew that if I worked really hard, I could do it. … And we just kept cooking and hiring cooks. … Eventually our tribe of misfits became our strongest weapon, and we developed this crew, and one day we got three stars from The New York Times.”

By 1997, he was made a partner of Aquavit and within a decade, he opened branches of the company in Stockholm, Tokyo and a Japanese-influenced restaurant called Riingo in New York. His restaurant, Red Rooster, which is located in Harlem, later followed in 2010. “It took me 25 years to build this and 10 days to break it down,” Samuelsson says of his restaurant empire which was hit by the coronavirus.

His restaurant empire was fetching him about $75 million in annual revenue, however, the coronavirus pandemic led to a drop in the company’s revenue by some 80%.

Like any other successful entrepreneur or businessman, Samuelsson had to navigate many obstacles before getting to where he is. He recalls how one of the restaurants he opened targeting the African-American community and the Caribbean failed. Merkato 55, which was located at Manhattan’s trendy Meatpacking District, closed a year after it was opened. “I didn’t know how much African [cuisine], how much Blackness to feature on the menu at Merkato 55,” he told CNBC.

Samuelsson is not only an internationally acclaimed chef but also an accomplished author of several cookbooks, including the James Beard award-winning “The Soul of a New Cuisine” and “Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home.”

Other written titles by Samuelson are “Aquavit” and the “New Scandinavian Cuisine, “En Smakresa (A Journey of Tastes),” and “Street Food.” Samuelson is a visiting Professor of International Culinary Science at the Umea University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts in Sweden. He is also the founder of the acclaimed website Food Republic.

Samuelsson was the winner of Bravo’s “Top Chef Masters Season Two” as well as the second season of “Chopped All-Stars.” He has also had a recurring role as a judge for “Chopped,” one of Food Network’s highest-rated series with a following of more than 20 million viewers a month, and was a mentor on ABC’s “The Taste,” guiding a team of new culinary talent through a series of challenges.

He has been featured on CNN, MSNBC’s “The Dylan Ratigan Show,” “Iron Chef USA,” Iron Chef America,” and “Today.” In 2009, he was selected as a guest chef at the White House under the Obama Administration, where he planned and executed the administration’s first state dinner honoring Prime Minister Manmohan Singh of India.

Samuelsson has contributed immensely to philanthropic endeavors, including serving as a UNICEF Ambassador, serving as a member of the U.S. State Department’s Chef Corps, and serving as the co-chairman for the organization Careers Through Culinary Arts Program, which works with public schools across the country to prepare underserved high school students for college as well as provide career opportunities in the restaurant and hospitality industry.

As an international patron of the arts, Samuelsson is honored to be a board member for both the Apollo Theater and the Museum of Modern Art.

Samuelsson married Maya Haile in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and resides in Harlem, New York. Samuelsson partnered with Karilitz and Company, with the support of Mayor Bill De Blasio, former President Bill Clinton, and Tren’ness Woods-Black to co-produce Harlem EatUp!, a food and culture festival in Harlem in May 2015, which returned for a second year in May 2016.

Samuelsson was recently inducted into the James Beard Foundation’s “Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America.”


Watch the video: USA: CHICAGO: PRESIDENT CLINTON VISIT (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Donaghy

    that we would do without your excellent idea

  2. JoJotaur

    Absolutely with you it agree. In it something is also idea excellent, I support.

  3. Samugis

    Are we all private messages sent today?

  4. Rock

    Hmm ... I was just thinking about this topic, but here such a post is gorgeous, thanks!



Write a message